The Unknown Soldier

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Released in 1968 by the Doors, the Unknown Soldier was considered an antiwar song and banned on many radio stations. The song, however was more of dig at the American media and the way that the Vietnam conflict was televised into our homes and became a part of our daily lives. The lyrics “Breakfast where the news is read/ Television children fed/ Unborn living, living dead/ Bullets strike the helmet’s head” portrays how the news of the Vietnam War was being presented to ordinary people.

Jim Morrison sings about how in the late 60’s American families stared at violent television images, watching a world far away where the unknown soldier is shot, yet life at home went on as usual.  The entire scenario seems to normalize the war. People were numb and continued to live their normal lives while their soldiers were dying. The fact that the soldier has no identity is also a strong message to the ignorance and lack of emotion that people had towards the men who were fighting ‘for them.’ And as we all know, the soldier who had no name came home to an unwelcoming party.

Today, military conflicts continue to play out daily on our televisions, our cell phone news feed and throughout social media.  This time those who are called to duty are welcomed home but soon forgotten by an overwhelmed VA and by the very people they serve. Today our veterans are faced with homelessness, mental health issueseducational hurdles, long waits and scandalous policies at the VA, and a military suicide rate of 22 a day.

It’s true that today’s veterans have never been more respected, unlike those who returned from Vietnam. But unlike Vietnam veterans many Americans have no personal connection to anyone who has served or is serving in the Armed Forces.  Many organizations have hit the media and social outlets to drum up support for Veterans in need but again, America’s eyes have glazed over to the  issues faced by our Veterans.  Even when it was discovered that a nonprofit claiming to help veterans at risk was misappropriating funds, there was little or no public reaction. And so, it seems the numbness prevails.

Forty years later the unknown soldier is the one struggling with PTSD. The unknown soldier is the one whose life was a daily pill that is now an addiction.  The unknown soldier is homeless. The unknown soldier is the one who suffers in silence. The unknown soldier is one of 22 each day that takes his own life.

Perhaps it’s time the unknown soldier had a name and America a plan to support those who served.

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Vietnam Combat Veteran Brian Delate Goes Back to Move Forward

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The post that follows comes from my dear friend Brian Delate who I first met in 1996. We were at a party at my daughter’s house, as Brian’s late wife Karen and my daughter were in graduate school together. I was immediately taken with both Brian and Karen, it was hard not to be. They were attractive and warm, funny and smart and they both loved movies, a passion we shared. Brian and I soon realized that we shared another passion, a commitment to helping veterans heal from the invisible wounds of war. As a Vietnam veteran, Brian knew, respected and came to love my late husband Hack and he always told me that if SFTT ever needed support, he would help us — and the veterans we strive to heal — in any way he could. In honor of Treatment of Ten, I asked Brian to write a piece for us. And he did. Beautifully and poetically. Thank you, Brian.  ~ Eilhys England Hackworth.

It is January 2013 and I am back in Vietnam as both an American Combat Veteran and a writer/performer of MEMORIAL DAY (when remembering makes you want to forget… and being forgotten makes you want to die…), a one-man show I enact.  In each performance, I must step into the limits of human experience, which for me is my time spent as a warrior in a specific war during a specific year: 1969-70.

I had visited Vietnam the year before.  In 2012, I stood on the hallowed ground, where death once danced wildly with (my) life, realizing that my invisible wounds of PTSD needed deeper exploration. I broke away from the group I was traveling with in Hanoi to spend 24 hours in Chu Lai – my area of operation where thousands of my fellow American soldiers were also stationed.  To “go back” was a challenge because as we all know Life Goes On. Or tries to. Once in Chu Lai, I saw some old hangars that are dormant, but now resemble something out of H.G. Wells’ Time Machine. The runways that were vibrantly active in 1969 are now barely discernible. In another few years they won’t be visible at all.

Now, in 2013, I am back in and around Chu Lai, with a driver, a translator and a cameraman. We drive around kind of hit-and-miss on different roads to see what I could remember. I forgot how very beautiful the beaches are. And for whatever reason, they are completely empty of people and development.  This absence intrigued me; what was I expecting? Wanting? Looking for, exactly? Life going on, perhaps?

We are on a mission of sorts. I had brought with me a snapshot of myself standing on a particular beach in a very striking cove-like area where I and another soldier saved a drunken infantry guy from drowning. In so doing, we all almost drowned. Very scary. I never imagined one of my near-death experiences during the Vietnam War would involve drinking and the ocean.

 

Having found the cove, my companions give me some time near to reflect and pray for all those who did not survive — and now, to my own surprise, I include the former enemy, the Vietnamese, their families, and their communities.

Believe me when I say how totally unthinkable this sentiment was at one time; I am surprised at my own compassion and ability to forgive.

At the end of this particular day in 2013, I stayed at a beautiful old Inn near Chu Lai for the night where I met an older, very fragile and very friendly Vietnamese man, who was one of the few Vietnamese I have met who admitted to fighting the communists. He expressed in very broken English the horrible aftermath for him and his family.  We connected emotionally, and at one point, he held my hand firmly, wept a little and thanked me for visiting. He then sent “good wishes” to the Americans.  This was just one “memorial moment” I experienced on my MEMORIAL DAY trip.

Days later, I complete two performances of my show with a singular astonishing result.  Once was at the University of Hanoi — college kids are college kids — meaning that they really do not care about the war. As they say repeatedly, “We’re tired of hearing about that war.”

In the other instance, we visited the Veterans Association of Vietnam (VAV) which is a high-level government agency with a new leader who can veto my performance in a second. In short, the stakes were high for me to knock their socks off.  The head of this agency was a Lt General (one of their war heroes) and he had three other senior officials with him along with our central government ‘minders’ and a couple of important representatives from the USA/Vietnam Society.

I got to do about 12 minutes of MEMORIAL DAY and it landed pretty powerfully on these men and women — they really got it. When I first met the General, we shook hands politely and we nodded. After I finished the piece, he immediately stood up, came over to me and, with great vigor, shook my hand hard. He then looked me in the eye and kept touching first his heart and then my heart with his fist, saying, through the translators, ‘We identify with the humanity.’

This surprised everybody. The other officials followed suit and the formalities disappeared and a load of personal sincerity and even some humor dropped into the room. My new friend on this trip, Pete, a former infantry captain, gave me a single line review — ‘You’ve got balls, man.’

A day or two later, we are at the Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences, where we would interact with a combination of their psychologists, veterans and students. Initially, there was the time-consuming formality of introductions and translations back and forth. Then Dr. Edward Tick (our leader and author of War and the Soul) gave a smart and informed speech, addressing what is known and has been gathered from both sides, with regard to the aftermath of the Vietnam War that took place here so long ago.

I sat next to one of their psychologists, also a Combat Veteran from circa 1970. He made very clear that everybody in his world (family, friends, immediate community, et al.) was involved with the fight against America. What really got my attention was how they dealt with returning soldiers. The family and the community shared the burden even more than the government.

There was an instance during the talk where one of the students questioned Dr. Tick’s assertion of the value of bringing American Veterans back to Vietnam — returning them to the scene of their trauma.

Dr. Tick has had tremendous success with helping hundreds of Veterans trust the healing benefits of one’s community and spirituality along with these kinds of “going back” visits.

I spoke up at this point because I was here last year in 2012, and at that time, instead of feeling some immediate kind of transformation, relief or release, I fell back into re-living many of the fears I had had during the war. I ended up re-experiencing some of the trauma versus working through it or purging it.

Let me explain.

While I was in the city of Hoi An in 2012, I was sitting in a very beautiful dining room at a very elegant hotel with my wife Karen.  We were having breakfast and a young waiter walked by.  He and I made eye contact. Immediately, an emotional tumor (as I have come to call them) erupted and I couldn’t stop it wailing. I had to get outside of the hotel in order to regroup.

Quick back story: As a young sergeant in 1969, after coming off of a rough night with my squad and not having slept for some time, I got into it with a young Vietnamese man.  We called them Cowboys. They were really just thugs — he spit in my direction and I went into a berserk rage and proceeded to beat him, almost to death. At one point, I left my body and felt like I was watching somebody else commit this violence. Finally, I could not pick up my arms to punch anymore, but this Cowboy kept trying to spit in my direction, even with one eye unattached and literally coming out of his head. After my maniacal behavior, I experienced another layer of deep self-loathing.

Anyway, back to 2012 and the hotel in Hoi An: After I was able to regroup, I went back into the dining room, sat back down with Karen and spoke about what had happened. As we continued to sit there, the same young waiter came by, smiled and asked me if I wanted more tea. This time nothing happened — we made eye contact once again, but in this instance a guilt-ridden memory was rapidly evaporating. It was like that scene in the film The Mission, where the DeNiro character endlessly drags his armor around as a form of punishment or penance, for having killed his brother. A native cuts the rope connecting him to the armor and he is free.

In that moment, after being triggered, re-living my trauma and then returning to breakfast, I experienced a significant purging that, in my opinion, would not or could not have taken place had I not been actively seeking more Meaning and Truth or Seeking what was Missing. I was replacing an old memory with a new memory, an important component to Healing.

In one of my last days in Vietnam 2013, I get to present a sample of my play at a Writer’s Conference with over a hundred Vietnamese writers and veterans in attendance. Some of what I present in the play does not need translation — it is a combination of specific movement with music that shapes a narrative of what it is like to prepare for combat, engage in that combat situation and then recover from combat. I use the overture from Tannhauser by Wagner, the music representing the sacred and the profane aspects of what Combat Warriors endure.

I want to mention that PTSD is a collective wound and a soldier/Veteran cannot carry that wound alone. If they try to, they will either collapse or the damage to the individual will never be healed and the casualties and hurt will continue to accumulate, affecting their family, friends, colleagues and community.

And lastly, the Greeks had this interesting insight on the — ‘Definition of Happiness – which is making full use of your powers along the lines of excellence.’ That does not mean living in any kind of perfection, but it is about living and living fully. That is what I am doing now and I am here to help my fellow Combat Veterans do the same thing.

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Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy: Give Veterans a Chance with Ben Richards

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As sound-bite politicians and Department of Veterans Affairs (“the VA”) administrators (past and present) slug it out over the future direction of the VA, Maj. Ben Richards has put together a comprehensive 8-week program to treat 10 fellow Veteran warriors who suffer from PTSD and TBI.

Hackworth-Richards Fundraiser

The program is called the Treatment of Ten. SFTT, founded by the legendary war hero COL David “Hack” Hackworth, is helping to raise $150,000 to help these brave Veterans get the therapy they deserve.

Some of these therapies are currently denied Veterans at the VA because of their entrenched bias against Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (“HBOT”) and other alternative treatment therapies. Sadly, the VA treatment offered to our Veterans for PTSD and TBI is shameful as amply documented by previous articles and blog posts published by SFTT.

In his own words, Maj. Ben Richards describes his experiences with the VA and explains that there is hope for Veterans and their caregivers who suffer from terrible brain injury.  Sadly, this non-invasive therapy is not available at the VA and won’t be anytime soon.

Found below are some of the non-invasive therapies that these Veterans in the Treatment of Ten will receive over an eight week period at an HBOT facility in Idaho.

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy or HBOT
Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a medical treatment which enhances the body’s natural healing process by inhalation of 100% oxygen in a total body chamber, where atmospheric pressure is increased and controlled. According to Harch Hyperbarics, “oxygen is transported throughout the body only by red blood cells.

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Transcranial magnetic stimulation is a method in which a changing magnetic field is used to cause electric current to flow in a small region of the brain via electromagnetic induction. iTMS employs a safe, painless, and non-invasive brain stimulation technology to generate a series of magnetic pulses that influence electrical activity in targeted areas of the individual’s brain.

High Performance Neurofeedback
High Performance Neurofeedback or EEG Neurofeedback is a noninvasive procedure that involves monitoring and analyzing EEG signals read through surface sensors on the scalp, and uses the EEG itself to guide the feedback.

Low Level Light Therapy
LLLT (aka as PBM or Photobio Modulation) uses “red or near-infrared light to stimulate, heal, regenerate, and protect tissue that has either been injured, is degenerating, or else is at risk of dying.”

Cranial Electrical Stimulation
CES uses waveforms to gently stimulate the brain to produce serotonin and other neurochemicals responsible for healthy mood and sleep. Proven safe and effective in multiple published studies, the device is cleared by the FDA to treat depression, anxiety and insomnia.

Maj. Richards plans to use these results to develop a template for other communities and medical facilities to adopt the same procedures in helping Veterans cope with debilitating brain injury.

Your support is needed to help with fund this initial program. Unlike many other Veteran support programs, 100% of ALL contributions go to support the TREATMENT OF TEN. If you want to truly support Veterans, please make a contribution now by CLICKING THIS LINK.

Let’s give our Veterans a chance to reclaim their lives.

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The VA and Shulkin: “It Shouldn’t Be This Hard to Serve Your Country”

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Dr. David Shulkin has been pushed aside (read fired) as the Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs (“the VA”).  Without taking sides in what appears to be yet another partisan issue, Dr. Shulkin did a reasonably good job in bailing water in a sinking ship:  the VA.

David Shulkin

As such, it was with regret that we read Dr. David Shulkin’s self-serving departure editorial in the New York Times “it should not be this hard to serve your country.”   Indeed, many Veterans poorly served by the VA have felt the same.  But these Veterans, with a legitimate claim were rarely afforded space in the editorial section of the New York Times to discuss their grievances.

The title of the New York’s editorial says it all:  “David J. Shulkin:  Privatizing the V.A. Will Hurt Veterans“.   I am not sure that Dr. Shulkin would have titled his departure editorial this way, but clearly, the New York Times, David Shulkin and J. David Fox, the President of the American Federation of Government Employees, agree that privatizing the VA will harm Veterans.

SFTT is unaware of any compelling evidence that providing “privatized” care to Veterans would jeopardize the mission of the VA or add to the difficulties of Veterans.  Indeed, J. David Fox, seems more concerned about the rights of unionized VA employees than he does about Veterans.

While it is easier to frame the discussion as a debate about the merits of public or private healthcare,  SFTT has long argued that the VA is simply Too Big to Succeed.  It never has been a question of “ownership” or “control,”  it is simply a case of an institution that has become too large to manage effectively.  With over 18 million Veterans, it is unlikely that an overwhelming majority would agree that the VA is provides services that are “second to none.”

In fact, Dr. Shulkin claims that “the percent of veterans who have regained trust in V.A. services has risen to 70 percent, from 46 percent four years ago.  This is not exactly a ringing endorsement on how well the VA is fulfilling its mission.

There are many areas of the VA that fulfill President Abraham Lincoln’s promise:  “To care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan” by serving and honoring the men and women who are America’s Veterans.

But there are other areas in which the VA fell well short of fulfilling President Lincoln’s promise.

Specifically, SFTT has for years called into question the way the VA has treated Veterans with PTSD and TBI:  “the silent wounds of war.”  There is compelling evidence that the VA, through its administrators, has consistently lied to Veterans, their caregivers, Congress and the public on the effectiveness of treating Veterans with brain injury.

More to the point, the VA medical staff has been grossly negligent in providing Veterans with opioids to treat the symptoms of PTSD and TBI rather than offer any real treatment.  Was the VA complicit in fueling the opioid epidemic?

Political posturing on the benefits of public or private ownership doesn’t really help the hundreds of thousands of Veterans suffering from brain injury and their largely forgotten caregivers.

Changing of the guard will do little to fix the VA.  Only a true bipartisan effort to address the problems of the VA will help restore confidence in an institution with far greater promise than the actual results it delivers.

Thank you for your service Dr. Shulkin.

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What Veterans with PTSD Should Know About Alternative Drugs

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Most every day there is a provocative news report suggesting that some “miracle drug” may help treat Veterans with PtSD and TBI.  If it is not a new drug, cannabis or ecstacy are often cited as “new” drugs that can help Veterans cope with  the debilitating symptoms of PTSD.

While many Veterans with brain injury and their caregivers hope that prescription medicine relief is on the way, the Department of Veterans Affairs (“the VA”) has a very poor track record in providing Veterans with the care that they deserve.  More to the point, prominent spokespeople for the VA – like Dr. David Cifu – give misleading information when they claim that the VA provides the best available treatment programs for PTSD and TBI.  This is simply not the case.

In fact, there are hundreds of stories documenting the frustration of Veterans with the staff of the VA.   The suicide of Veteran Eric Bivins as told by his wife is just one of many horrific stories of how doctors at the VA callously treat Veterans.

When all else fails (as it normally does), the VA prescribed drugs – in many cases, opioids.  Mind-altering drugs was to “go-to” choice for overworked VA medical personnel who still don’t know how to deal with, let alone treat brain injury.

While we all remain hopeful that drug relief is just around the corner, it seems likely that the new “miracle” drug will only deal with the symptoms of behavioral changes caused by PTSD and TBI.  Veterans consulted by SFTT  seek a permanent or semi-permanent solution that avoids invasive drugs.  Found below are questions Veterans and their caregivers should consider when thinking about using “alternative” drugs.

What Veterans Should Know About “Alternative” Drugs

There is much “buzz” in social media channels and even authoritative medical websites on important new breakthroughs on “drugs” to help Veterans with with PTSD and TBI.   Given the wide disparity in treating brain injury, it seems unlikely that marijuana, MDMA or others in clinical trial will provide a long term solution.

There is a vast difference between providing therapy that permits Veterans with PTSD and TBI to recover their lives than supplying prescription drugs which treats the symptoms.  As the public has painfully learned from the opioid epidemic, prescription drugs that treat only the symptoms can have detrimental side-effects.

VA’s Research on Alternative Drugs

The VA continues to help fund initiatives to identify less addictive drugs that help Veterans cope with chronic pain, depression and anxiety.  Clinical trials take several years to complete and there is a lengthy regulatory and review process to obtain FDA approval.

Selected SFTT Posts on Alternative Drugs

Opioids:  Bi-Partisan Incompetence in D.C.

The VA and Opioids:  The Finger-Pointing Begins

Marijuana and Veterans with PTSD

Genetics to Cannabis:  Implications for Treating PTSD

Veterans with PTSD Knew that VA Opioid Prescriptions Were Wrong

SFTT’s Position on “Alternative” Drugs

SFTT sincerely hopes that researchers and the medical profession will hopefully create a variety of new – and less addictive – drugs to treat Veterans with PTSD and TBI.  Nevertheless, members of the medical profession must clearly distinguish between drugs that treat “symptoms” and those that may offer long term remission from brain injury.  For reasons that are not entirely obvious, the VA does not make that distinction public. Sadly, the VA’s track record is not good in dispensing prescription drugs to Veterans with brain injury.  

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Leaving No Warriors Behind

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We’ve got great news!

We recently kicked off TREATMENT OF TEN, a very important fundraising campaign hosted by YouCaring, which helps treat Combat War Veterans with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and/or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

I know that my late husband David “Hack” Hackworth would be very proud of our collective good work to “leave no man behind,” as he used to say.

Why TREATMENT OF TEN?

 Because our goal is help 10 Combat War Veterans regain the will to live. Invisibly wounded warriors such as those suffering from TBI and/or PTSD are 25 times more likely to commit suicide than their Veteran peers. So far, the VA and DOD have provided few effective treatment options at the national level for the majority of those afflicted with the physically and emotionally crippling side-effects of either brain trauma or PTSD.

With each $15,000 we raise, we can send ONE soldier to a residential facility in Idaho where each sufferer of TBI and/or PTSD will receive an innovative multi-modality TBI and PTSD treatment program that’s already restored our Director of Veteran Affairs, MAJ Ben Richards to “active duty” as a husband, father, PhD student and community member.

Together, we can send 10 Vets by May 4, 2018, the 13th anniversary of Hack’s death and the 20th anniversary of his legacy foundation, Stand for the Troops (SFTT).

That’s why we’re asking you to take a “stand for the 10 Broncos” who served in Troop 1-14 CAV during combat operations in Iraq under Ben and sustained brain injuries after hitting IEDs (improvised explosive device) or being attacked by IED-laden vehicles.

TREATMENT OF TEN combines most of the medical and alternative therapy protocols that SFTT has vetted and been supporting for years – from hyperbaric (HBOT) to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (iTMS) to equine therapy to Low-Level Light therapy (LLLT). But we hadn’t developed a way to facilitate the treatment plan in one location.

Until now.

Click here for more information on our TREATMENT OF TEN initiative and how you can help us help those who served.

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Purdue Pharma Reigns In the Opioid Peddlers

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In typical cavalier fashion, drug giant Purdue Pharma has decided to curtail the sale of OxyContin that has brought misery and death to tens of thousands addicted to opioids.

Purdue Pharma Oxycontin

Why it has taken so long for this scandal to end – particularly to families who have lost loved ones – is difficult to fathom.  Perhaps, the allure of bonuses for licensed drug peddlers or the irresistible pull of a higher stock price blinded this company from the inescapable evidence that it was hooking Americans on lethal drugs.

In a scathing article entitled “Pain Pill Giant Purdue Pharma to Stop Promotion of Opioids to Doctors,” by Jared Hopkins, Bloomberg reports that Purdue plans to cut half of its sales force and concentrate instead on “promoting the company’s opioid induced constipation drug, Symproic.”

Needless to say, State and local governments are mounting huge suits against the predatory marketing practices of Purdue.  No doubt, local governments will win major financial judgements against Purdue Pharma, but will there be any assets left after Purdue Pharma files for bankruptcy?  More importantly, how can you possibly place a value on the thousands of lives that have been destroyed by this toxic drug company that has done more damage to our society than all of the Colombian drug lords combined?

More importantly, PURDUE PHARMA DID IT WITH THE FULL SUPPORT AND KNOWLEDGE OF THE US GOVERNMENT.  

SFTT has been reporting on this shameful tragedy for well over five years.  We documented how Veterans received these powerful narcotics from the Department of Veterans Affairs (“the VA”) and flushed them down the toilet or crushed them into powder to sell them on the black market.

It is sad that the President’s Commission on Drug Addiction and opioid abuse finds that “the modern opioid epidemic originated within the healthcare system,” but it is CRIMINAL to entrust the resolution of drug addiction to the very same healthcare agents that created this problem.

While non-invasive treatment for PTSD and TBI like hyperbaric oxygen therapy are rigorously dismissed by the VA in favor of new drugs, Veterans are unlikely to find that their lives are restored to any semblance of what it was in the past.

It is hard to believe that Purdue Pharma has been aggressively peddling their toxic drugs in our backyard (Stamford), but it would appear that our healthcare system is rigged to encourage more abuses

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News for Veterans with PTSD or TBI: Week Ending 2 Feb 2018

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The Department of Veteran Affairs (the “VA”) struggles to provide effective therapy for Veterans with PTSD and TBI.  As such, SFTT has will now focus its attention on providing Veterans and their families cope with information on promising new alternative therapies to help brave warriors cope with brain injury.

The devastating effect of brain injury for hundreds of thousands of Veterans and their families cannot be underestimated.  While SFTT will focus primarily on “new” therapy programs, we will occasionally report on the very unsettling problems faced by Veterans and their families as they seek to recover their lives.

Some “alternative” therapies have already proven to be quite successful, but many others are not widely known to Veterans or the medical profession at large.   Even if these programs were endorsed or approved by the VA, treatment is often beyond the financial means of most Veterans.

While SFTT will let the “news” speak for itself, the science of treating brain injury is still in its infancy.  SFTT attempts to provide balanced reporting of the pros and cons of these emerging therapy programs but strongly encourages the reader to make up their own mind as to their efficacy.

Brain Injuries May Start at a Young Age

A recent article in the New York Times entitled, “Hits to the Head May Result in Immediate Brain Damage,” is troubling for families raising children where contact sports is often a way of life.

While the nature of brain injuries suffered by Veterans leading to PTSD and TBI are far different, the New York Times article suggests that there is still much to be learned in treating concussive events.

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy or CTE

SFTT has reported on several occasions that the NFL has been investigating a brain condition called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (“CTE”) which appears to be caused by repeated blows to the head causing a protein called tau to spread and kill brain cells.

For many years the NFL and the VA has tried to hide the effects of debilitating brain injuries from players and Veterans, but the evidence is now overwhelming that concussive events may cause irreparable damage to sensitive brain tissue and cells.

Many parents are already pulling their children from junior football programs and some soccer leagues now prohibit children below the age of 12 from “heading the ball” to avoid brain and neck injuries.  Just recently, star performer Justin Timberlake who will perform at halftime at the Superbowl announced that “my son will not play football.”

Shouldn’t this be a warning message to all parents?

Ketamine Could Help Veterans with PTSD

Promising “new” drugs materialize daily that claim to help Veterans cope with the symptoms of PTSD and TBI.  Ketamine, approved by the FDA many years ago for sedating people (but not approved for treating traumatic events) has become a popular treatment option for Veterans that have exhausted VA remedies.

The San Antonio Express News, reports that Ketamine “has achieved good results in clinical trials.”  It adds that “the military also is interested in its use . . . and that two health facilities will treat active-duty troops and veterans. The research is funded by the Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs.”

The San Antonio Express News adds that “clinics use the drug off-label, and protocols, staffing and dosing can differ widely from one clinic to the next.   Despite the lack of supporting clinical evidence, many seek ketamine for relief.  “Even at low doses it alters the senses. Critics say the effects of longtime use remain unknown and wonder if ketamine clinics put vulnerable patients at risk.”

SFTT Commentary:  As in all mind or sensory altering drugs, there are risks that are not fully understood by the medical profession.  SFTT continues to support noninvasive therapies, particularly over unregulated and untested drug options.

Army Research Laboratories and Helius Research Neurological Wellness

According to a press release from Aerotech News,

“The U.S. Army Research Laboratory and Helius Medical Technologies, Inc., from Newton, Penn., have partnered to expand on early research that could mean new interventions for improving Soldier readiness and resilience, as well as reducing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD.

“As part of a cooperative research and development agreement, or CRADA, ARL and Helius are launching a research program to investigate Helius’ Portable Neuromodulation Stimulator for the enhancing cognitive and psychological readiness and response through mindfulness meditation training. Helius is focused on neurological wellness.

“Researchers from both organizations will combine the use of the neuromodulator with mindfulness meditation training and assess participants’ neurocognitive performance and self-reported symptoms before and after training.”

SFTT Commentary:   While this joint research program seems promising, the Army Research Laboratory has often placed troop “readiness” ahead of troop safety.  SFTT hopes that this study will prove different.

SFTT readers are encouraged to drop us a line if they discover an interesting new therapy to treat PTSD or TBI or would like to share a public interest story.  SFTT can be reached at info@sftt.org.

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Happy 2018!

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Is it too late to wish you all a happy new year? We think not!

Here at SFTT we’ve been busy wrapping up our 2017 initiatives and planning for an even better 2018 with new programs and partners to help Veterans suffering from Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Post Traumatic Stress (PTSD).

During the past year, Stand for the Troops, the Little Organization That Could and Has, hit a major milestone — we turned 20! Twenty, old enough to be a combat soldier which, in many ways we are. SFTT is at war helping American Veterans combat invisible war wounds.

In 2017, we fought for — and aided — our Veterans who suffer from TBI and PTSD by:

  • Securing educational grants 2017 for west coast Veterans wanting to pursue a career in sustainable agriculture and presently, a 2018 grant to continue this program is being reviewed. We’re also working to expand this program to make it available to Veterans on the east coast.
  • Helping fund Attention-Bias Modification Treatment for PTSD research at Columbia University and the New York State Psychiatric Institute by supporting the Principal Investigator, Dr. Yuval Neria. Dr. Neria’s other related projects establish innovative trauma care for Veterans and their family members, such as Man of War Project & Military Family Wellness Center.
  • Working in concert with the Knights of Columbus on The Frank Robotti Golf Classic where we raised awareness and funds for service dogs. We’ll be awarding money to a local service dog program soon.

In 2018 we plan to continue this good work while introducing a program that focuses on our co-founder, Col. David “Hack” Hackworth’s commitment to safeguarding frontline soldiers with more than lip service. Our new treatment plan, unveiled in the next few weeks, integrates proven medical and wellness therapies to effectively treat combat-related traumatic brain injury.

We’d love to hear from you so please drop us a line at info@sftt.org!

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Latest News for Vets with PTSD & TBI: 26 Jan 2018

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The Department of Veteran Affairs (the “VA”) continues to struggle to provide effective therapy for Veterans with PTSD and TBI.  As such, SFTT has decided to focus most of its attention on helping Veterans and their families cope with the ravages of the silent wounds of war.

The devastating effect of brain injury for hundreds of thousands of Veterans and their families cannot be underestimated.  While SFTT will focus primarily on “new” therapy programs, we will occasionally report on the very unsettling problems faced by Veterans and their families as they seek to recover their lives.

Some “alternative” therapies have already proven to be quite successful, but many others are not widely known to Veterans or the medical profession at large.   Even if these programs were endorsed or approved by the VA, treatment is often beyond the financial means of most Veterans.

While SFTT will let the “news” speak for itself, the science of treating brain injury is still in its infancy.  SFTT attempts to provide balanced reporting of the pros and cons of these emerging therapy programs but strongly encourages the reader to make up their own mind as to their efficacy.

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy or “HBOT”


Among the most promising therapies is hyperbaric oxygen therapy or “HBOT,”   Essentially, HBOT consists of a series of controlled dives in a compression chamber where Veterans receive oxygen under pressure.  Many independent research studies have confirmed the efficacy of HBOT, but the VA and the DoD have consistently claimed that there is limited evidence to sustain the assertion that HBOT helps to improve brain function.

Despite the VA’s policy, many countries use HBOT to treat brain injury.  In fact, the Israel Defense Forces (“IDF”) use HBOT to treat any concussive event for its military personnel.  SFTT has written often about the efficacy of HBOT.

Nevertheless, VA spokesperson Dr. David Cifu continues to claim that current VA program are more effective than HBOT.  The clinical evidence strongly suggests that Dr Ciful is misleading Veterans, Congressional subcommittees that oversee the VA and the public about the lack of efficacy of HBOT.   SFTT will fully address Cifu’s “misspeaks” and “questionable” scientific evidence at a later date.

Combat Veterans Coming Home with CTE

Not all news is “good news” for Veterans suffering from brain trauma.  There is now evidence that some Veterans suffering from PTSD may have CTE or  chronic traumatic encephalopathy .  The 60 Minutes Video which accompanies this article, highlights the painful story of one Veteran’s “discovery” that he had an incurable brain injury.

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy or CTE

SFTT has been reporting for months how the NFL has been dodging the nasty public relations surrounding CTE, but now (unsurprisingly) evidence suggests that this terrible degenerative disease of the brain may also be affecting Veterans who have been exposed to a series of concussive events.

MDMA for PTSD Enters Final Trials

According to an article published in Newsweek, the final round of clinical trials for MDMA assisted psychotherapy could lead the way for the United States to approve the drug for therapeutic use as early as 2021.

The third and final phrase of trials gets underway after the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) designated MDMA as a “breakthrough therapy” for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in August 2017, ensuring that it will work with advocates to complete the last phase quickly.

MDMA, or 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine, is an empathogen, meaning that it stimulates togetherness and trust among users. It also inhibits activity in the brain that treats fear and stimulates hormones that make people feel more connected. While some may refer to MDMA and ecstasy interchangeably, MDMA is the pure form of the drug, while ecstasy can be cut with unknown adulterants.

SFTT Commentary:   SFTT has written several times about the use of MDMA (aka “Ecstasy”) in treating PTSD.  While final trial results for MDMA will not be known for several years, it is worth remembering that drugs that treat behavioral or pain symptoms but produce no long-lasting improvement in brain function may not be cause for celebration.  Let’s face it, the President’s Final Report on Combating Drug Addiction (page 20) states quite clearly that “the modern opioid crisis originated within the healthcare system.”    Will another drug prove more effective?

Written Exposure Therapy “WET”

According to a press release by Marilynn Larkin for the Psych Congress Network, “Written Exposure Therapy (“WET”) is noninferior to first-line cognitive processing therapy (CPT) for treating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and can be delivered in fewer sessions, researchers say.”

WET involves writing about a traumatic experience under clinical guidance, using a structured format.

“Our study has important implications for clinicians, as it suggests that PTSD can be effectively treated using a much shorter, less burdensome intervention – i.e., five sessions, minimal face-to-face time with the therapist, no between-session homework assignments – than what is typically used in clinical practice,” Dr. Denise Sloan of National Center for PTSD, VA Boston Healthcare System, told Reuters Health.

SFTT Commentary:  The suggestion that WET is “noninferior to first-line cognitive processing therapy (“CPT”) is hardly a ringing endorsement.  Despite VA propaganda to the contrary, CPT has been largely unsuccessful in treating Veterans with PTSD.

SFTT readers are encouraged to drop us a line if they discover an interesting new therapy to treat PTSD or TBI or would like to share a public interest story.  SFTT can be reached at info@sftt.org.

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