Carolyn May and Wiggles

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PTSD is an ugly, devitalizing, and enervating disorder. Sometimes you just want to hide and avoid people completely. It is difficult to do the things you once loved and PTSD symptoms have adverse and detrimental effects on relationships. When one considers what it means to be well, what it means to be mentally healthy, it is essential that we interact with others have compassion not only for other people, but for ourselves.

Compassion, companionship…. That’s what a service dog provides for their battle buddy. In 2018, I was blessed with the opportunity to receive a service dog from a non-profit organization Healing4Heroes. The process started with choosing a dog. I think Wiggles actually chose me. She is super loving and energetic. I thought to myself “This dog will force me to get out of bed,” even on days when I’m severely depressed and have zero motivation.

Wiggles presence has changed my life for the better. I have a reason to get out of bed, even on the days where the depression is consuming, and I don’t want to do anything. Even if the only thing she does is lay by me on those days where I don’t want to get up, her unconditional love is unfailing. In a world where it is hard to find compassion and unconditional love, my service dog is an exact reflection of those human needs.

I can walk into Walmart with her by my side without feeling panicked or overwhelmed by the excessive amounts of people. PTSD symptoms have caused me to be excessively situationally aware, to the point where I create danger in my mind that is not physically present. My service dog can post and make me aware of when someone is coming up behind me. She can put space between myself and another person so that I can maintain my personal boundary bubble. When I have mobility issues, wiggles gives me a brace to get back up on.

Wiggles senses my anxiety and puts her paw on me to put me in check and make me aware of my mood. She just looks at me and with her big brown eyes, tells me that I’m ok and I need to take a break. When I experience seizures from conversion disorder, she will place pressure on me and relieve some of the thrashing from the muscle spasms. I have an extreme aversion to touch, but that has not stopped Wiggles from giving me a hug every time I walk through the door (hug is actually now a command). In being affectionate with my service dog, I have slowly become more comfortable with human touch.

Having a service dog has made me a better person. I’ve gotten pieces of myself back that PTSD, depression, and anxiety stole from me. I am less withdrawn. I am more confident. I feel like me again.

Getting a rescue dog for a service dog actually rescued me.

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Mike Arena & Orion

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Orion (my service dog) over the years has drastically reduced my symptoms of PTSD.

Since Orion…

I can have a connection with my family; reintegrating with the lives of my 4 children and soon to be 3 grandchildren from a previous life and now a long-term relationship with my girlfriend and her daughter.

I can go back to work; regaining a since of belonging to society and communicate with others.

I can go to the to the grocery story in the middle of back-to-school-shopping crowds versus waiting to 0200 on a Thursday with no people in the store.

I can go into large crowds attending a volley ball game or just having a nice dinner out without having to look for the exits.

I can “pay it forward” as Orion, my service dog, has given me confidence in allowing me to start a service dog non-profit in helping other veterans realize how a service dog can be used as a tool for the internal wounds, just like a prosthetic leg might be a for a visible wound.  We can speak at public forums for community outreach– raising awareness to veteran suicide; reducing the numbers one service dog at time.

Mike Arena

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SFTT Service Dog Salute Photo Campaign

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‘Some dogs help people see, while others
help them forget what they’ve seen!’

Stand for the Troops (SFTT), the David Hackworth legacy foundation, is Saluting Service Dogs with a photo campaign launching on PTSD Awareness Day, June 27th, 2018. Veterans and their families are encouraged to submit candid or portrait photographs of themselves and their service dog companion along with a short narrative about WHY this canine relationship has reduced the symptoms of post-traumatic stress (PTSD). The campaign will conclude on September 6th, 2018 when one Veteran will be selected to receive a year’s supply of Dog food. The announcement will be made at the Frank J. Robotti Golf Classic luncheon and recipient does not need to be present.

While the US Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) acknowledges that owning a dog can “lift your mood” and that “All dog owners, including those who have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can experience these benefits,” the VA still doesn’t acknowledge the value, both psychological and monetary, of canine companionship to Veterans.

The good news? The Contemporary Clinical Trials has designed the first-ever study to quantify the palliative effects of service dogs for Veterans who suffer from PTSD.

But the SFTT Medical Task Force doesn’t need a trial to know how restorative the relationship between a transitioning serviceman or woman and his/her service dog can be. Whether you’re recently separated from active duty or you’ve been a civilian for many years, we recognize the impact these animals have had on your lives, which is why we fund service dog programs throughout the US.

SFTT’s Service Dog Salute Photo Campaign is about you and your service dog. We know that so many Veterans have experienced the therapeutic benefits of having a PTSD service dog and we want to hear about — and see — your unique relationship with your canine.

Submit your Story and High Resolution Digital Photo to info@SFTT.org and we’ll post both your story and photo.  Dog Food recipient will be notified by phone so be sure to include name, address, email and phone number with your submission.

By submitting your story (500 words or less) and a photo of your battle buddy, you agree that it can be posted in its entirety along with any images on SFTT social media streams and SFTT.org.

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The Endocannabinoid System & PTSD:  Could Hemp Oil Be The Missing Link?

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Written by Fatima Cook and Gregg Cook

Let us begin with the basics.

What Is The Endocannabinoid System?

First documented in the 1990s, this system is a relatively new discovery and is an internal (endo-) receptor for cannabidiol, serving as a modulator and communicator between all the other systems in the body.  These receptors are found in the brain and gut as well as the immune, cardiovascular, nervous and endocrine systems, and even in the nuclear membrane of cells. When this enormously important endocannabinoid system is properly primed with sufficient cannabinoids – which in optimal health, the body is able to self-produce – the body maintains homeostasis, or balance, and functions the way it is naturally designed to do. In this way, the body can heal itself. We now know that, aside from the endogenous cannabinoids the body produces, they can also be found in small concentrations in such foods as cacao, echinacea, and fish oil, and is even present in mother’s breast milk.  In its most concentrated form, cannabinoids are found in cannabidiol, or hemp oil, also commonly referred to as CBD.

Hemp oil is extracted from the cannabis sativa plant (or the marijuana plant) and is one of the plant’s two main active compounds – the other being delta-9-terahydrocannabinol, or THC, the one producing psychoactive effects – the well-known “high.”  It has shown powerful results as a treatment for a variety of formerly untreatable conditions, ranging from auto-immune and neuro-degenerative diseases, epileptic seizures, chronic pain, anxiety, insomnia and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), often experienced by Veterans.

How Can Hemp Oil Treat PTSD?       

Hemp oil mitigates two defining characteristics of PTSD: the terror PTSD sufferers experience reliving past trauma and the anxiety that this terror can cause. The immense, unrelenting stress and fear which lead to the disorder cause significant dampening of the endocannabinoid system and the brain’s ability to regulate memories.  Hemp oil fills the gaps, priming the system to self-regulate and expedite the elimination of a conditioned fear. Hemp oil or CBD works synergistically with the body to quell anxiety, therefore allowing for a more restful night’s sleep without the disruption of flashback memories. The added benefit of hemp oil is that it works its magic without the psychoactive component of the hemp plant.

Not All Hemp Oils Are Created Equal

While there are many hemp products in the marketplace today, it is important to know which ones will provide relief and not empty the bank account. The first thing to know is that some CBD products are plant-based while others are lab-created.  Look for plant-based — nature usually does things better than chemicals. Specifically, search for a hemp oil that is derived from the whole plant, including stalks and stems, and pristinely grown without the use of pesticides.

Second, make sure the hemp oil is meticulously extracted so that the amount of remaining THC is undetectable.

Last, but of equal importance, is the bio-availability of the oil.  What we mean by this, is that most dietary supplements need to travel through the digestive tract in order to be processed and for its positive effects to take hold.  In the case of hemp oil, most of the beneficial compounds (upwards of 90%) are destroyed through the digestive process, turning it into a relatively useless, very expensive supplement.  An efficient and bioavailable hemp oil should have two distinct features:

  1. It should be delivered to the body through high-grade liposomes.  A liposome is a microscopic sphere made of phospholipids, the basic building blocks of cell membranes.
  2. Its particle size should be miniscule, ideally, nano-sized (1/100th the width of a single human hair).

When these two features are combined, the absorption of the oil into the body rapidly begins in the mouth.  Consumed regularly, a state of calm focus and restorative well-being can be easily attained.

Looking for more research?  There are thousands upon thousands of studies out there.  Have a look at pubmed.gov and projectcbd.org.

Please contact us at Deep Health Evolution with any questions or concerns about how hemp oil might help reduce the debilitating effects the “invisible wounds” of PTSD and traumatic brain injury (TBI) have on Veterans.

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Farming As A Non-Pharma Rx For Veterans With PTSD

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While many Combat Veterans who suffer from Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and/or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) follow conventional medical protocols involving high dosages of anti-depressants, others have discovered a more “natural” way to heal from invisible war wounds.

Through farming.

“It’s as natural as it gets,” says MAJ Ben Richards, SFTT Director of Veteran Affairs. “Working outside with your hands in the earth to help plants grow and feed people?  It doesn’t get much more rewarding than that for many survivors of wartime trauma.”

Just as farming is palliative for Combat Veterans, these civilian soldiers may be the cure for the farming industry.  While the suicide rates of American Veterans and American Farmers are both rising at unprecedented speed, the key to halting this acceleration may ironically lie within the symbiotic relationship between the two occupations.  Research shows that Veterans with PTSD feel a greater sense of purpose and community when working as farmers.

One of our partners, Archi’s Institute for Sustainable Agriculture (AiSA) offers courses in sustainable agriculture for Veterans and military service members that have not only afforded these men and women jobs, but have also ameliorated their PTSD symptoms.

“Our goal at Archi’s Institute is to provide Veterans who suffer from TBI and/or PTSD with the tools and knowledge they need to either start their own small hydroponic farms or to work for other farmers,” says Karen Archipley, Co-Founder and Marketing Manager (AiSA).  “We’ve seen Veterans who are struggling to function in their daily lives come to our Institute and not only learn skills that help them forge a new career path, but they also make friends and emotional connections, giving their lives renewed meaning.”

This new breed a warrior-farmer may be just what the “dying breed” of hands-on agriculture needs.

As we approach Memorial Day, please consider giving to Treatment of Ten, our fundraising initiative to send 10 Broncos for our integrative TBI/PTSD rehabilitative program, consisting of a non-prescription drug protocol, including organic farming among other therapies.

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Treatment of Ten Campaign Extension Until Memorial Day, May 28, 2018

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Guess what?

Because of you, the Treatment of Ten fundraising campaign is becoming a success.

We’ve raised almost enough funds to send one Combat Veteran to our medical facility in Idaho so that he can receive the treatments and therapies that he needs. Now, we need to send the other nine!

To do that, we’ve extended the campaign until Memorial Day because we’re determined to follow Hack’s “orders” to take care of his men and women who are forever on the tip of the sword, whether it be physically when in combat or mentally when at home. These ten Broncos whom we’re committed to help heal are struggling with Traumatic Brain Injury and /or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder here at home, constantly reliving their tours in Iraq!

I’ve been reading some statistics, old and new that have re-broken my heart:

• About 7 or 8 out of every 100 people (or 7-8% of the population) will have PTSD at some point in their lives. About 8 million adults have PTSD during a given year. This is only a small portion of those who have gone through a trauma. About 10 of every 100 women (or 10%) develop PTSD sometime in their lives compared with about 4 of every 100 men (or 4%). Learn more about women, trauma and PTSD. (https://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/ptsd-overview/basics/how-common-is-ptsd.asp)

• Two-thirds of homeless Iraq and Afghanistan veterans in one major sample had post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) — a much higher rate than in earlier cohorts of homeless veterans, who have PTSD rates between 8 percent and 13 percent, according to a study in press in the journal Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research. (http://www.apa.org/monitor/2013/03/ptsd-vets.aspx)

• For many service members, being away from home for long periods of time can cause problems at home or work. These problems can add to the stress. This may be even more so for National Guard and Reserve troops who had not expected to be away for so long. Almost half of those who have served in the current wars have been Guard and Reservists. (https://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/ptsd-overview/reintegration/overview-mental-health-effects.asp)

• Another cause of stress in Iraq and Afghanistan is military sexual trauma (MST). This is sexual assault or repeated, threatening sexual harassment that occurs in the military. It can happen to men and women. MST can occur during peacetime, training, or war. (https://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/ptsd-overview/reintegration/overview-mental-health-effects.asp)

• One early study looked at the mental health of service members in Afghanistan and Iraq. The study asked Soldiers and Marines about war-zone experiences and about their symptoms of distress. Soldiers and Marines in Iraq reported more combat stressors than Soldiers in Afghanistan. This table describes the kinds of stressors faced in each combat theater in 2003:

• Soldiers and Marines who had more combat stressors had more mental health problems. Those who served in Iraq had higher rates of PTSD than those who served in Afghanistan. (https://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/ptsd-overview/reintegration/overview-mental-health-effects.asp)

• Thousands of men and women continue to risk their lives in the United States military to protect the freedom of citizens like me. Their psychological and physical well-being of every human being is important. It is particularly important to care for those who get injured while protecting all of us. Why not reach out and help us today to at least take care of our first cohort of 5 who served and sacrificed.
(https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/curious/201409/11-reasons-combat-veterans-ptsd-are-being-harmed)

Let’s keep the needle moving. Please give today to help send the Broncos to Idaho.

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Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy: Give Veterans a Chance with Ben Richards

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As sound-bite politicians and Department of Veterans Affairs (“the VA”) administrators (past and present) slug it out over the future direction of the VA, Maj. Ben Richards has put together a comprehensive 8-week program to treat 10 fellow Veteran warriors who suffer from PTSD and TBI.

Hackworth-Richards Fundraiser

The program is called the Treatment of Ten. SFTT, founded by the legendary war hero COL David “Hack” Hackworth, is helping to raise $150,000 to help these brave Veterans get the therapy they deserve.

Some of these therapies are currently denied Veterans at the VA because of their entrenched bias against Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (“HBOT”) and other alternative treatment therapies. Sadly, the VA treatment offered to our Veterans for PTSD and TBI is shameful as amply documented by previous articles and blog posts published by SFTT.

In his own words, Maj. Ben Richards describes his experiences with the VA and explains that there is hope for Veterans and their caregivers who suffer from terrible brain injury.  Sadly, this non-invasive therapy is not available at the VA and won’t be anytime soon.

Found below are some of the non-invasive therapies that these Veterans in the Treatment of Ten will receive over an eight week period at an HBOT facility in Idaho.

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy or HBOT
Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a medical treatment which enhances the body’s natural healing process by inhalation of 100% oxygen in a total body chamber, where atmospheric pressure is increased and controlled. According to Harch Hyperbarics, “oxygen is transported throughout the body only by red blood cells.

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Transcranial magnetic stimulation is a method in which a changing magnetic field is used to cause electric current to flow in a small region of the brain via electromagnetic induction. iTMS employs a safe, painless, and non-invasive brain stimulation technology to generate a series of magnetic pulses that influence electrical activity in targeted areas of the individual’s brain.

High Performance Neurofeedback
High Performance Neurofeedback or EEG Neurofeedback is a noninvasive procedure that involves monitoring and analyzing EEG signals read through surface sensors on the scalp, and uses the EEG itself to guide the feedback.

Low Level Light Therapy
LLLT (aka as PBM or Photobio Modulation) uses “red or near-infrared light to stimulate, heal, regenerate, and protect tissue that has either been injured, is degenerating, or else is at risk of dying.”

Cranial Electrical Stimulation
CES uses waveforms to gently stimulate the brain to produce serotonin and other neurochemicals responsible for healthy mood and sleep. Proven safe and effective in multiple published studies, the device is cleared by the FDA to treat depression, anxiety and insomnia.

Maj. Richards plans to use these results to develop a template for other communities and medical facilities to adopt the same procedures in helping Veterans cope with debilitating brain injury.

Your support is needed to help with fund this initial program. Unlike many other Veteran support programs, 100% of ALL contributions go to support the TREATMENT OF TEN. If you want to truly support Veterans, please make a contribution now by CLICKING THIS LINK.

Let’s give our Veterans a chance to reclaim their lives.

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The VA and Shulkin: “It Shouldn’t Be This Hard to Serve Your Country”

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Dr. David Shulkin has been pushed aside (read fired) as the Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs (“the VA”).  Without taking sides in what appears to be yet another partisan issue, Dr. Shulkin did a reasonably good job in bailing water in a sinking ship:  the VA.

David Shulkin

As such, it was with regret that we read Dr. David Shulkin’s self-serving departure editorial in the New York Times “it should not be this hard to serve your country.”   Indeed, many Veterans poorly served by the VA have felt the same.  But these Veterans, with a legitimate claim were rarely afforded space in the editorial section of the New York Times to discuss their grievances.

The title of the New York’s editorial says it all:  “David J. Shulkin:  Privatizing the V.A. Will Hurt Veterans“.   I am not sure that Dr. Shulkin would have titled his departure editorial this way, but clearly, the New York Times, David Shulkin and J. David Fox, the President of the American Federation of Government Employees, agree that privatizing the VA will harm Veterans.

SFTT is unaware of any compelling evidence that providing “privatized” care to Veterans would jeopardize the mission of the VA or add to the difficulties of Veterans.  Indeed, J. David Fox, seems more concerned about the rights of unionized VA employees than he does about Veterans.

While it is easier to frame the discussion as a debate about the merits of public or private healthcare,  SFTT has long argued that the VA is simply Too Big to Succeed.  It never has been a question of “ownership” or “control,”  it is simply a case of an institution that has become too large to manage effectively.  With over 18 million Veterans, it is unlikely that an overwhelming majority would agree that the VA is provides services that are “second to none.”

In fact, Dr. Shulkin claims that “the percent of veterans who have regained trust in V.A. services has risen to 70 percent, from 46 percent four years ago.  This is not exactly a ringing endorsement on how well the VA is fulfilling its mission.

There are many areas of the VA that fulfill President Abraham Lincoln’s promise:  “To care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan” by serving and honoring the men and women who are America’s Veterans.

But there are other areas in which the VA fell well short of fulfilling President Lincoln’s promise.

Specifically, SFTT has for years called into question the way the VA has treated Veterans with PTSD and TBI:  “the silent wounds of war.”  There is compelling evidence that the VA, through its administrators, has consistently lied to Veterans, their caregivers, Congress and the public on the effectiveness of treating Veterans with brain injury.

More to the point, the VA medical staff has been grossly negligent in providing Veterans with opioids to treat the symptoms of PTSD and TBI rather than offer any real treatment.  Was the VA complicit in fueling the opioid epidemic?

Political posturing on the benefits of public or private ownership doesn’t really help the hundreds of thousands of Veterans suffering from brain injury and their largely forgotten caregivers.

Changing of the guard will do little to fix the VA.  Only a true bipartisan effort to address the problems of the VA will help restore confidence in an institution with far greater promise than the actual results it delivers.

Thank you for your service Dr. Shulkin.

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Equine Therapy for Veterans with PTSD and TBI

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There is considerable anecdotal evidence that supervised exposure of Veterans with PTSD and TBI to horses helps restore a sense of well-being.  Nevertheless, an adequate number of controlled clinical experiments are lacking to determine whether equine therapy has any lasting benefits for Veterans suffering from brain injury.

Equine Therapy for Veterans with PTSD

As reported earlier, Dr. Yuval Neria is Professor of Medical Psychology at the Columbia University Medical Center and “Scientific Advisor” to Stand for the Troops (“SFTT”) is leading a clinical study for the Man O’War Project in the hope of developing adding more scientific credibility to the notion that exposure to animals helps Veterans with brain injury.

While Equine therapy is not as widely known within the Veteran community as service dogs, it is yet another non-invasive process to help Veterans recover from the “silent wounds of war.”

What is Equine Therapy?

According to CRC Health, “Equine Therapy (also referred to as Horse Therapy, Equine-Assisted Therapy, and Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy) is a form of experiential therapy that involves interactions between patients and horses.

How Does Equine Therapy Work?

Equine Therapy involves activities (such as grooming, feeding, haltering and leading a horse) that are supervised by a mental health professional, often with the support of a horse professional.

CRC Health goes on describe the therapeutic aspects of Equine Therapy, both during the activity and after the patient has finished working with the horse, the equine therapist can observe and interact with the patient in order to identify behavior patterns and process thoughts and emotions.

The goal of equine therapy is to help the patient develop needed skills and attributes, such as accountability, responsibility, self-confidence, problem-solving skills, and self-control. Equine therapy also provides an innovative milieu in which the therapist and the patient can identify and address a range of emotional and behavioral challenges.

What is the VA’s Position on Equine Therapy?

While acknowledging that there may be some benefits from Equine Therapy, the VA currently does not endorse the programs claiming that there is insufficient “evidence” to support the benefits of the therapy.  

How Much Does Equine Therapy Cost?

According to the National Center for Equine Facilitated Therapy (“NCEFT”) “the cost of twice daily feeding, individual grooming and exercise, stall cleaning, specialized supplemental grain, and session staffing (horse handler and therapist), comes out to between $115 and $300 a session, depending on the type of therapy,

Selected SFTT Posts on Equine Therapy

Equine Assisted Therapy for Veterans with PTSD

Equine-Assisted Therapy Seek Veteran Volunteers

Equine Therapy and Service Dogs for Vets

Additional Resources

Equine-Assisted Therapy

Man O’ War Project

Equine Therapy from CRC Health (Promotional)

Lessons to be Learned from Equine Therapy

National Center for Equine Facilitated Therapy

SFTT Position

While there currently is a lack of scientific or clinical “evidence” that Equine-Assisted Therapy helps Veterans with PTSD and TBi, there are strong indications that the “bonding” and responsibility required to handle a horse promotes “wellness.”    Whether this sense of well-being is sustainable outside of a controlled environment is yet to be determined.

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What Veterans with PTSD Should Know About Alternative Drugs

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Most every day there is a provocative news report suggesting that some “miracle drug” may help treat Veterans with PtSD and TBI.  If it is not a new drug, cannabis or ecstacy are often cited as “new” drugs that can help Veterans cope with  the debilitating symptoms of PTSD.

While many Veterans with brain injury and their caregivers hope that prescription medicine relief is on the way, the Department of Veterans Affairs (“the VA”) has a very poor track record in providing Veterans with the care that they deserve.  More to the point, prominent spokespeople for the VA – like Dr. David Cifu – give misleading information when they claim that the VA provides the best available treatment programs for PTSD and TBI.  This is simply not the case.

In fact, there are hundreds of stories documenting the frustration of Veterans with the staff of the VA.   The suicide of Veteran Eric Bivins as told by his wife is just one of many horrific stories of how doctors at the VA callously treat Veterans.

When all else fails (as it normally does), the VA prescribed drugs – in many cases, opioids.  Mind-altering drugs was to “go-to” choice for overworked VA medical personnel who still don’t know how to deal with, let alone treat brain injury.

While we all remain hopeful that drug relief is just around the corner, it seems likely that the new “miracle” drug will only deal with the symptoms of behavioral changes caused by PTSD and TBI.  Veterans consulted by SFTT  seek a permanent or semi-permanent solution that avoids invasive drugs.  Found below are questions Veterans and their caregivers should consider when thinking about using “alternative” drugs.

What Veterans Should Know About “Alternative” Drugs

There is much “buzz” in social media channels and even authoritative medical websites on important new breakthroughs on “drugs” to help Veterans with with PTSD and TBI.   Given the wide disparity in treating brain injury, it seems unlikely that marijuana, MDMA or others in clinical trial will provide a long term solution.

There is a vast difference between providing therapy that permits Veterans with PTSD and TBI to recover their lives than supplying prescription drugs which treats the symptoms.  As the public has painfully learned from the opioid epidemic, prescription drugs that treat only the symptoms can have detrimental side-effects.

VA’s Research on Alternative Drugs

The VA continues to help fund initiatives to identify less addictive drugs that help Veterans cope with chronic pain, depression and anxiety.  Clinical trials take several years to complete and there is a lengthy regulatory and review process to obtain FDA approval.

Selected SFTT Posts on Alternative Drugs

Opioids:  Bi-Partisan Incompetence in D.C.

The VA and Opioids:  The Finger-Pointing Begins

Marijuana and Veterans with PTSD

Genetics to Cannabis:  Implications for Treating PTSD

Veterans with PTSD Knew that VA Opioid Prescriptions Were Wrong

SFTT’s Position on “Alternative” Drugs

SFTT sincerely hopes that researchers and the medical profession will hopefully create a variety of new – and less addictive – drugs to treat Veterans with PTSD and TBI.  Nevertheless, members of the medical profession must clearly distinguish between drugs that treat “symptoms” and those that may offer long term remission from brain injury.  For reasons that are not entirely obvious, the VA does not make that distinction public. Sadly, the VA’s track record is not good in dispensing prescription drugs to Veterans with brain injury.  

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