Preventing Concussions: Can Help be on the Horizon?

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Concussions and preventing concussions continues to be a hot topic in the media, particularly when parents decide whether to allow their kids to play contact sports.

Treating PTSD and TBI also receives its share of attention, but most of the media coverage seems to be focused on coping with the symptoms of brain injury rather than offer any meaningful long-term solution for Veterans with these conditions.

Far less attention is devoted to preventing concussions in the first place.  Perhaps, we should be moving forward on all fronts simultaneously.

military drugs

Just this week the FDA just approved a series to trials to evaluate ecstasy to help people cope with PTSD.

After successful preliminary trials, the FDA is moving forward with a large scale study for using Ecstasy as a prescription drug to treat post-traumatic stress disorder.

The study approved on Tuesday would be the final measure necessary before the agency could legalize the drug, according to the New York Times. If the results are favorable, the drug also known as MDMA would be available to patients as early as 2021.

While some may view this new FDA initiative with relief, I am not encouraged by yet another new drug that treats the symptoms of PTSD rather than drugs that permanently reverse brain damage itself.   As we have seen with opioids, treating symptoms opens up a pandora’s box of other medical and neurological problems, particularly when these medications are combined with other prescription drugs.

Granted, reversing brain injury is new uncharted territory, but many Veterans seem to have lost hope that permanently improving  brain “wellness”  is considered to be a high priority for either the VA or the FDA.

If this is the case – and I hope it is not – then studies focused on reducing the incidence of concussion certainly take on far more importance.  Found below is a recent Ted Talk  by David Camarillo focused on developing new protective gear to reduce concussions:

Mr. Camarillo takes issue with both the CDC and NFL models of what happens when a concussive-event occurs. Swedish scanning imagery points to something far different occurring within the brain than what is argued by conventional sources.

Could it be that existing helmet designs for the military and the NFL are based on flawed models and questionable scientific research?

I don’t know the answer to that question, but I continue to be disturbed by the conflicting messages sent out by the VA, the FDA, the CDD and the NFL.  Surely, “I don’t know,” is a far more honest answer than continued claims by those in authority that “we are making progress” in helping Veterans with PTSD or protecting NFL players.

If the flawed product were an automobile which caused a fatality, a recall notice would be issued.  How is it possible that the NFL continues to operate with impunity when the evidence strongly suggests that repeated concussions causes chronic traumatic encephalopathy (or ”CTE’)

The recent FDA “Ecstasy” trial isn’t particularly reassuring, particularly knowing that the results will not be available until 2021.

Questions that seem more relevant would be these:

– Will Dr. David Cifu continue to dictate VA protocols in treating concussive events?

– When will military helmet sensor data be released to the scientific community to help provide our brave military personnel with better helmets?

– Can the VA provide any clinical evidence that it has successfully treated and “cured” PTSD and/or TBI?

– Are more drugs the answer to treat PTSD?

I can’t answer these questions, but tens of thousands of brave men and women with PTSD and TBI deserve an answer.

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PTSD and the Super Bowl

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As we all settle in to watch the Super Bowl tomorrow, let us reflect on the large number of brave Veterans who have suffered from PTSD and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Indeed, there are enough wounded Veterans from our wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to fill several Super Bowl stadiums.

PTSD and CTE

Nevertheless, I suspect that sports’ pundits will be more focused on CTE – chronic traumatic encephalopathy – found on the brain of former pro quarterback, Kenny Stabler caused by “repeated blows to the head.” Indeed, there is now a list on Wikipedia that lists the number of deceased pro football players that were diagnosed with CTE.

Veterans with post traumatic stress disorder and/or TBI now exceed some 200,000 and they are simply not receiving the treatment they require to reclaim their lives.  The Veterans Administration’s preferred solution is to mask the symptoms of brain trauma with an often lethal cocktail of pharmaceuticals. At the same time the VA blocks other far more inexpensive technologies, like Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy,  used around the world.  Why?

PTSD by the Numbers

Less we forget, please find below a video from the late Navy S.E.A.L, Chris Kyle who explains how difficult it is for some Veterans to adjust after they come home from war.  We now believe that some 20% of Veterans are affected by some form of brain trauma, although many experts believe that the number is far higher.  Listen to Chris Kyle:


via: PTSD by the Numbers: Battling Post Traumatic Stress Video

As we watch the Super Bowl, let us reflect on the conditions of our brave Veterans and the personal demons they face each day.

UK Troops Suffering from PTSD and Depression

Traumatic brain injury is not only prevalent in the US, but the British Armed Forces are also coping with serious problem.  Based on the statistics below, they are probably underestimating the scope of the problem, but it is clear that they see clear evidence of “alcohol-related” behavioral disorders and Veterans try to “self-medicate.”  Substance abuse is rampant among Veterans in the US, particularly with those who suffer from PTSD.   One health specialist suggested it could be as high as 90%.

See what the British say about traumatic stress among their own troops:

Of those, 1,235 have been awarded compensation and discharged with post-traumatic stress disorder. The figures, obtained under a Freedom of Information request, show 718 were discharged for depression, while 130 were suffering from alcohol-related behavioral disorders.

Speaking yesterday Patrick Rea, of the charity PTSD Resolution, said: “Assuming that most of these cases involve the Army, it brings us to a ratio nearing one in 10. Previous figures suggest that around two per cent of troops across all branches are suffering from PTSD. Of course, the problem is that there is a latency about PTSD that may not show up in official figures.Then, five years after they leave, it results in breakdown of their marriage, loss of employment and even criminality.”
via: Rising toll of stressed out troops suffering from PTSD and depression

Mental Health Week: PTSD and Suicide

Jenny Hale, a Public Relations graduate student at the Newhouse School of Public Communications, discusses below the relationship between PTSD and suicide.   While Jenny is right to suggest contacting the CRISIS LINE at 1-800-273-8255 for help, the Veterans Administration has not done a good job in helping Veterans with PTSD.  I would take the advice provided below with a grain of salt.

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Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a mental health problem that can occur after someone goes through a traumatic event like war, assault, an accident or disaster. Symptoms can start immediately after an event or can develop years later. These symptoms usually include flashbacks or memories, sleep problems or nervousness. Indicators lasting longer than a month may be related to PTSD.

Since 2002, 128,496 service members have been diagnosed with PTSD after being deployed in post-9/11 wars. The highest numbers reported were in the year 2012, with over 20,000 total cases between deployed and non-deployed soldiers.

If you or someone you know is suffering from PTSD, there are several outlets for both civilians and military to find help.

  • VA Center—All VA hospitals have care for PTSD. Contact your nearest VA Medical Center for an appointment.
  • Consult a therapist—The International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies can help locate a clinic near you. Find a list here.
  • Call the Veterans Crisis Line—Family and friends, as well as veterans, can speak to VA workers 24/7 online or by phone for confidential support. 1-800-273-8255 or chat with a professional here.

Suicide is another serious mental health issue among veterans. A veteran commits suicide every hour, while a service member commits suicide every day. 8,000 veterans commit suicide every year.

24 percent of suicides include veterans with PTSD symptoms and 66 percent of those have been deployed. Over 50 percent of veterans had no sign of behavioral health disorders prior to their death.

Suicide is preventable. If you or someone you know is showing feelings of guilt, saying that life isn’t worth living or expressing failure, seek help through the Suicide Prevention Line at 1-800-273-8255.
via: Mental Health Week: PTSD and Suicide

While I too will be sitting around the television watching this great American tradition of the Super Bowl, I will think of our many Veterans suffering from PTSD who don’t have access to the latest therapies available to help them reclaim their lives.  CTE has surfaced as a “big issue” within the NFL.  I only wish Veterans with PTSD and/or TBI would receive the same level of national attention.

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Military News Highlights: December 2, 2010

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‘Progress Made’ In Afghanistan’s Helmand Province

When interviewed by . Generic drugs that do so should have the same therapeutic effect and therefore the same benefits as their brand-name counterparts, but at less cost.

“But let’s talk a little bit about Marja, because I know that’s one you’ve been following. If you could come over and visit today I would take you down to the district center, where across the street is a very nice restaurant that’s opened up – two dining rooms. You can get a really nice chicken dinner there. There’s three major bazaars in town, all three flourishing. All of the activity now – all the enemy activity in Marja’s been pushed to the perimeter, where a few lone insurgents creep back, usually at night, and try to intimidate some of the locals. And have not done a very good job of it.”

When asked to comment on Sanjin, heartland of the current bloodbath that has claimed the lives of at least 14 Marines assigned to 3rd Battalion, 5th Regiment since mid-September, General Mills made no mention of this sacrifice but commented that, “It’s been tough fighting. It continues to be tough fighting. I think that Sangin is Marja, perhaps five months ago. And we are going to remain focused on that mission up there, and we will win.”

When they start serving chicken dinners in Sangin, I guess the General can claim victory.

The following two news reports from the New York Times add to SFTT’s recent discussion on combat related and sports related head injuries and trauma and the stark difference between the actions taken by the sports industry and lack of action and non-prioritization of these type injuries taken by the Congress, DoD, and the Services.

Scans Could Aid Diagnosis of Brain Trauma in Living

If athletes are subject to chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CET) as a result of sustained head trauma, then it’s obvious that US troops are prone to CET in the future as well due to combat related head trauma.   In fact, Boston-based researchers have developed new imaging techniques that confirmed CET in athletes brains with a history of head trauma.  Currently, CET can only be confirmed through a specialized brain tissue examination after death.  So imagine if you can monitor CET and its symptoms and treat these injuries effectively.  Why wait until you are on the morticians slab to confirm the obvious?  While there is more work to be done with the initial positive results of this new type of imagining and study, the question that remains is whether or not this type of sports/medical science will ever transfer over to DoD and its medical services as it identifies, monitors, and treats troops suffering from TBI. Probably not given their track record.

Ward Calls League Hypocritical on Safety

Maybe Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Hines Ward is onto something in his criticism of the National Football League’s recent call and emphasis on safety.  Ward’s take is that the league only toughened its stance because of a pending desire to extend the season to 18 games.   If DoD, the services, and Congress ever wake up and start addressing combat related head injuries and trauma properly maybe it’s because they want to extend the time spent on the battlefield as well.  Nah, just because 2011 turned into 2014 and beyond in Afghanistan doesn’t mean that there is going to be new emphasis placed on improving helmets and reducing head injuries and traumas.  In Afghanistan, its all systems forward without these types of safety and quality of life considerations.  Why should we kid ourselves and believe there was a purpose for “extending the season”.

Department of Defense Headquarters Staff Comparisons (2000-2010)

Senator James Webb requested a pre-and post-9/11 staff comparison of Department of Defense, Services, and Combat Command Headquarter as he studies the Department’s recent decision to axe Joint Forces Command.   After nearly a decade, of the 17 reporting headquarters there has been approximately 11,000 civilian/military staff personnel billets added.  If you only take uniform personnel back into the fold you could man at least two Brigade Combat Teams – imagine that!  Read more from Tom Ricks.

Dragon EOD Squad Leader Sergeant First Class “William”

Just in time for the holidays.  Your very own toy-set of body armor, Advanced Combat Helmet, and an M-4 carbine!  Enjoy!

  • The set is outfitted in the newer ACH, with older style Interceptor body armor in woodland camouflage, and helmet with woodland camouflage cloth cover.
  • Weapon: M4 Assault Rifle or M4 Carbine with Infrared Pointer / Illuminator, Aimpoint optic sight, Forward Hand Grip, tactical light attached under the barrel, retractable / extendable butt stock and removable magazine.
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