Thank you Rachel Maddow

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I would like to thank Rachel Maddow not only for honoring my late husband Colonel David Hackworth, on October 17, but also for honoring all fallen soldiers past and present as well as their families.

As I watched the opening segment of Tuesday’s The Rachel Maddow Show on MSNBC, I was so deeply touched I had chills, then tears in my eyes. I didn’t know that Hack would be featured and I wasn’t prepared for Rachel’s heartfelt recounting of my beloved husband’s years of service to our country and his troops. He served in more wars than anyone his age should have and he did so brilliantly and proudly. And when he left the military, he never really left. His network of everyone from military brass to grunts was extensive, with new “recruits” calling him almost daily to find out how they could help him “stand for the truth” while supporting the troops – with more than lip service.

This number of veterans whose lives Hack touched still astounds me. At Stand for the Troops the foundation Hack and I founded, we receive emails, tweets, Facebook posts and letters from servicemen and women worldwide who remember Hack’s legacy of getting to the truth behind the “story,” whatever that narrative was and how that it was spun. From Rumsfeld to better armor for desert combatants, David made sure the media “got it right.”

While listening to Rachel, I was hearing a journalist with similar integrity and determination. A reporter who night after night, just as Hack did on Larry King post 9/11, has the same commitment to viewers: to ask difficult questions and demand answers. So it was last week when Rachel spoke about how we honor those who volunteer to die, sustain injuries or endure a lifetime of invisible battle wounds for all of us.

Every day at SFTT, we continue Hack’s desire to help living veterans suffering quietly from Traumatic Brain Injury, (TBI) and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) find help. We’ve partnered with various treatment providers to deliver therapies that veterans say work far better with less side effects than those offered by the VA.

If you’d like to honor Hack’s legacy of fearlessly ferreting out the truth and helping veterans improve their quality of life, please contact us.

And thank you, Rachel, for remembering my husband’s heroism with such accuracy, tenderness and respect.

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SFTT Military News: Week Ending Mar 10, 2017

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Found below are a few military news items that caught my attention this past week. I am hopeful that the titles and short commentary will encourage SFTT readers to click on the embedded links to read more on subjects that may be of interest to them.

If you have subjects of topical interest, please do not hesitate to reach out. Contact SFTT.

Turkey Seeks to Develop Military Cooperation with Russia on Syria
President Tayyip Erdogan sought to build cooperation with Russian leader Vladimir Putin on Friday over military operations in Syria, as Turkey attempts to create a border “safe zone” free of Islamic State and the Kurdish YPG militia. Erdogan, referring to Islamic State’s remaining stronghold, told a joint Moscow news conference with the Russian President “Of course, the real target now is Raqqa”. Turkey is seeking a role for its military in the advance on Raqqa, but the United States is veering toward enlisting the Kurdish YPG militia – something contrary to Ankara’s aim of banishing Kurdish fighters eastwards across the Euphrates river.  Read more . . .

Dangerous Military Options for North Korea
Frustrated that North Korea has been undeterred by international sanctions, the administration of U.S. President Donald Trump is conducting a policy review to look for more effective ways to counter Pyongyang’s missile and nuclear threats. Adding new urgency to this longstanding security threat is North Korea’s accelerated efforts to develop the capability to strike the U.S. mainland with a nuclear tipped intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM.) In January President Trump tweeted “it will not happen,” in response to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un’s statement indicating that his country would soon test an ICBM.  Read more . . .

Support Options to Help Veterans Finish College
Military veterans face steep challenges when trying to reintegrate themselves in school after service, ranging from lacking the structure of the military to being older than their classmates. Compared to their non-vet peers, veterans — 4% of undergrads nationwide, according to American Council on Education — report at higher rates that they struggle to connect with campus, which can lead to higher dropout rates. In 2011, 51.7% of veteran students graduated from college, compared to 58% of non-veteran students, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. To help more vets stay in school and graduate, several universities nationwide have started programs to teach their staff and faculty about military culture and veterans’ issues. DuBord helped Binghamton adopt one such training program, called Vet Net Ally.   Read more . . .

Drug Abuse

Expanded Drug Testing for Military Applicants
The Defense Department will be expanding drug testing for military applicants to check for all drugs that are tested in active duty military members, according to DoD.  The change, set to take place on April 3, is meant to reflect “the level of illicit and prescription medication abuse among civilians, as well as the increase in heroin and synthetic drug use within the civilian population,” according to Army Col. Tom Martin.  Read more . . .

Can PTSD Risk be Estimated Before Deployment?
Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin are studying cortisol and testosterone in soldiers. Cortisol, the stress hormone, is released as part of the body’s flight-or-fight response to life-threatening emergencies. Testosterone is one of the most important of the male sex hormones. Their findings, published in the journal of Psychoneuroendocrinology, look at cortisol’s critical role in the emergence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but only when levels of testosterone are suppressed.   Read more . . .

PTSD:  Misconceptions and Latest Treatments
Medscape recently interviewed Dr Sonya Norman, director of the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Consultation Program, run by the executive branch of the National Center for PTSD, about common misconceptions related to PTSD and the latest treatments for the condition.  Read more . . .

Drop me an email at info@sftt.org if you believe that there are other subjects that are newsworthy.

Feel you should do more to help our brave men and women who wear the uniform or our Veterans? Consider donating to Stand For The Troops

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