Leaving No Warriors Behind

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We’ve got great news!

We recently kicked off TREATMENT OF TEN, a very important fundraising campaign hosted by YouCaring, which helps treat Combat War Veterans with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and/or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

I know that my late husband David “Hack” Hackworth would be very proud of our collective good work to “leave no man behind,” as he used to say.


 Because our goal is help 10 Combat War Veterans regain the will to live. Invisibly wounded warriors such as those suffering from TBI and/or PTSD are 25 times more likely to commit suicide than their Veteran peers. So far, the VA and DOD have provided few effective treatment options at the national level for the majority of those afflicted with the physically and emotionally crippling side-effects of either brain trauma or PTSD.

With each $15,000 we raise, we can send ONE soldier to a residential facility in Idaho where each sufferer of TBI and/or PTSD will receive an innovative multi-modality TBI and PTSD treatment program that’s already restored our Director of Veteran Affairs, MAJ Ben Richards to “active duty” as a husband, father, PhD student and community member.

Together, we can send 10 Vets by May 4, 2018, the 13th anniversary of Hack’s death and the 20th anniversary of his legacy foundation, Stand for the Troops (SFTT).

That’s why we’re asking you to take a “stand for the 10 Broncos” who served in Troop 1-14 CAV during combat operations in Iraq under Ben and sustained brain injuries after hitting IEDs (improvised explosive device) or being attacked by IED-laden vehicles.

TREATMENT OF TEN combines most of the medical and alternative therapy protocols that SFTT has vetted and been supporting for years – from hyperbaric (HBOT) to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (iTMS) to equine therapy to Low-Level Light therapy (LLLT). But we hadn’t developed a way to facilitate the treatment plan in one location.

Until now.

Click here for more information on our TREATMENT OF TEN initiative and how you can help us help those who served.


Happy 2018!

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Is it too late to wish you all a happy new year? We think not!

Here at SFTT we’ve been busy wrapping up our 2017 initiatives and planning for an even better 2018 with new programs and partners to help Veterans suffering from Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Post Traumatic Stress (PTSD).

During the past year, Stand for the Troops, the Little Organization That Could and Has, hit a major milestone — we turned 20! Twenty, old enough to be a combat soldier which, in many ways we are. SFTT is at war helping American Veterans combat invisible war wounds.

In 2017, we fought for — and aided — our Veterans who suffer from TBI and PTSD by:

  • Securing educational grants 2017 for west coast Veterans wanting to pursue a career in sustainable agriculture and presently, a 2018 grant to continue this program is being reviewed. We’re also working to expand this program to make it available to Veterans on the east coast.
  • Helping fund Attention-Bias Modification Treatment for PTSD research at Columbia University and the New York State Psychiatric Institute by supporting the Principal Investigator, Dr. Yuval Neria. Dr. Neria’s other related projects establish innovative trauma care for Veterans and their family members, such as Man of War Project & Military Family Wellness Center.
  • Working in concert with the Knights of Columbus on The Frank Robotti Golf Classic where we raised awareness and funds for service dogs. We’ll be awarding money to a local service dog program soon.

In 2018 we plan to continue this good work while introducing a program that focuses on our co-founder, Col. David “Hack” Hackworth’s commitment to safeguarding frontline soldiers with more than lip service. Our new treatment plan, unveiled in the next few weeks, integrates proven medical and wellness therapies to effectively treat combat-related traumatic brain injury.

We’d love to hear from you so please drop us a line at info@sftt.org!


Military Helmet Sensors: Big Contracts but No Findings?

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Many years ago (perhaps 10), the US Army started began installing sensors in helmets to track the impact of IED events on brain trauma among combat troops.


SFTT reported in 2010 that BAE Systems unveiled its latest concussion sensor for soldier helmets, named Headborne Energy Analysis and Diagnostic System (“HEADS”).  Apparently, BAE and the military have been tracking military “concussive” events for some time since the press release refers to an earlier version already installed in military helmets.

As reported in a 2010 post entitled “New Helmet Sensor to detect Traumatic Brain Injuries”:

“The HEADS smart sensor is also designed to provide medical professionals with important data that may help determine the severity of a possible traumatic brain injury (“TBI”). The second generation HEADS sensor reportedly provides medical teams with a valuable diagnostic tool that utilizes radio frequency technology.   Spokesperson Colman claims that “With our new ‘smarter’ sensor, if a soldier is exposed to a blast, possibly sustaining a concussion, not only will the HEADS visual LED display be triggered at the time of the event, but once the soldier enters a specified area, such as forward operating base or dining facility, a series of strategically placed antennae will scan all available HEADS units and send data to a computer, identifying any soldiers who may have sustained a blast-related brain injury.”

Two years later, SFTT followed up with another post asking the next logical question:  “Military Helmet Sensor Data: What does it show?”

Today, some five years later, SFTT is asking the same question:  Where is the data and what does it tell us about concussive events suffered by men and women on the battlefield?

As SFTT speculated earlier:

“As recent history shows, the US Army and DOD are unwilling to share relevant data with the public that might suggest that the equipment provided to our brave warriors is deficient.   In fact, Roger Charles, the Editor of SFTT, was obliged to file a request under the Freedom of Information Act (“FOIA”) to obtain forensic records of troops killed with upper torso wounds to evaluate the effectiveness of military-issue body armor.   A  federal judge in Washington, D.C. recently ordered the Army’s medical examiner to release information about the effectiveness of body armor used by U.S. soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan or to justify the decision to withhold it.  For Roger Charles and those in SFTT who have followed this issue for several years, it is unlikely that the US Army will open their kimono and confirm what most already know:  the body armor issued to our troops was not properly tested and is most likely flawed.”

In the absence of compelling evidence to the contrary, one can only conclude that the military has discovered serious structural flaws in the designs of the “standard-issue” combat helmet, but doesn’t want to alarm combat troops (or their families).  Presumably, the “mad scientists” at the Soldier’s System Center at Ft. Belvoir are fast at work trying to build a safer helmet, but one must question how this invaluable data is being shared with those who study brain injuries.

It is alarming to think that even the secretive and misleading NFL leadership has been far more forthcoming about brain injuries than our military leadership.   It is both sad and frustrating that the DoD and VA have not been more proactive in sharing this information with scientists and the medical community so that we can take responsible action to help brave young men and women protect themselves from harm and assist those with brain trauma recover their lives.

Frankly, hiding under traditional military fallback position of “we don’t want the enemy to know the vulnerabilities of our equipment” rings a bit hollow when 22 Veterans are committing suicide each day.




Points of View: Al Jazeera on Treating Veterans with PTSD

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There was a time when many considered Al Jazeera to be a voice of Middle Eastern terrorists.   Whether it was or not is a matter of conjecture, but most would now agree that Al Jazeera has morphed into a credible news organization.

In an era of conflicting points of view, “alternative facts,” political agendas and outright lies; it is difficult to find common ground or agreement on any issue.  As such, it is surprising that Reem Shaddad of Al Jazeera has written such an insightful article on the plight of US Veterans entitled:  “The Battle Within:  Treating PTSD in Military Veterans.”

Department of Veterans Affairs

While one could nitpick some of her conclusions, it is difficult to refute the argument that within the Department of Veterans Affairs (“the VA”) “the McDonaldisation of mental healthcare is a problem.”

” . . . if you go to any VA in the country, you’re going to probably get cognitive processing therapy or cognitive behavioural treatment (actually, prolonged exposure) because those are the evidence-based practices that they use. It’s like if you go to any McDonald’s, a cheeseburger is going to be the same.”

Yep, the VA only serves two flavors of milkshakes (chocolate and vanilla) to treat Veterans with PTSD:

  • Cognitive Processing Therapy, and
  • Prolonged Exposure Treatment.

More to the point, if the VA’s two PTSD therapy programs don’t work, its doctors are likely to prescribe a cocktail of potent drugs to keep the Veteran’s symptoms in check.   This is hardly the outcome our brave warriors and their families should expect.

For an organization that prides itself on providing “evidence-based” medical treatment to Veterans, the GAO and the Rand Corporation have found that these programs resulted in negligible benefits for Veterans with PTSD.   In effect, “evidence-based” medicine seems to apply to every “alternative” therapy program other than the failed programs mandated by the VA.

As distinguished members of medical profession talk about “evidence-based” medical programs to treat PTSD, one can only wonder how warriors with the symptoms of PTSD in the distant past coped without the benefit of clinical trials.

Mind you, acupuncture seems to be have successful for some 2,000 years without the benefit of clinical trials.    The benefits of oxygen therapy programs have been around for centuries and there have been many documented therapy programs listed since as early as the 1930s.    Nevertheless, the folks at the VA – headed-up by chief spokesperson, Dr. David Cifu – still dispute the benefits of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in treating Veterans with PTSD.

Despite efforts by Reem Shaddad and many others to expose the hypocrisy within the VA,  Veterans with PTSD and TBI will need to seek help outside the VA.

SFTT is not convinced that there is a “silver bullet” to cure PTSD and TBI, but it is abundantly clear that the two PTSD therapy programs mandated by the VA are not effective.  For this reason, SFTT endorses a far wider use of alternative therapy programs to provide Veterans with a “real” choice over the VA’s failed programs.

Sure, there will be some “snake-oil” peddlers and charlatans that seek to take advantage of Veterans, but it is unlikely to be nearly as severe as the opioid epidemic perpetrated by the “evidence-based” healthcare system.


Thank you Rachel Maddow

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I would like to thank Rachel Maddow not only for honoring my late husband Colonel David Hackworth, on October 17, but also for honoring all fallen soldiers past and present as well as their families.

As I watched the opening segment of Tuesday’s The Rachel Maddow Show on MSNBC, I was so deeply touched I had chills, then tears in my eyes. I didn’t know that Hack would be featured and I wasn’t prepared for Rachel’s heartfelt recounting of my beloved husband’s years of service to our country and his troops. He served in more wars than anyone his age should have and he did so brilliantly and proudly. And when he left the military, he never really left. His network of everyone from military brass to grunts was extensive, with new “recruits” calling him almost daily to find out how they could help him “stand for the truth” while supporting the troops – with more than lip service.

This number of veterans whose lives Hack touched still astounds me. At Stand for the Troops the foundation Hack and I founded, we receive emails, tweets, Facebook posts and letters from servicemen and women worldwide who remember Hack’s legacy of getting to the truth behind the “story,” whatever that narrative was and how that it was spun. From Rumsfeld to better armor for desert combatants, David made sure the media “got it right.”

While listening to Rachel, I was hearing a journalist with similar integrity and determination. A reporter who night after night, just as Hack did on Larry King post 9/11, has the same commitment to viewers: to ask difficult questions and demand answers. So it was last week when Rachel spoke about how we honor those who volunteer to die, sustain injuries or endure a lifetime of invisible battle wounds for all of us.

Every day at SFTT, we continue Hack’s desire to help living veterans suffering quietly from Traumatic Brain Injury, (TBI) and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) find help. We’ve partnered with various treatment providers to deliver therapies that veterans say work far better with less side effects than those offered by the VA.

If you’d like to honor Hack’s legacy of fearlessly ferreting out the truth and helping veterans improve their quality of life, please contact us.

And thank you, Rachel, for remembering my husband’s heroism with such accuracy, tenderness and respect.


Opioids: Unanimous Bipartisan Incompetence in DC

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Just when one was beginning to wonder whether politicians could agree on anything comes the CBS/Washington Post story that shows that the Senate unanimously passed H.R. 471 – Ensuring Patient Access and Effective Drug Enforcement Act of 2015, which stripped the DEA of any enforcement capability and greatly fueled the opioid epidemic in our country.

Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia voices his outrage in an interview with MSNBC:

Sadly, the wake up moment for me occurs at about 4 minutes and 20 seconds into the video when Senator Manchin explains the “vetting” process used by Congressmen and Senators to approve legislation.

Basically, the take away from Senator Manchin’s interview (and several others he gave) are the following:

  • U.S. Legislation is written by lobbyists;
  • Politicians don’t read the legislation that is enacted into law unless one of their constituents or a government agency raises a “red flag;”
  • Complex laws are enacted by Congress and the Senate without anyone really understanding the consequences of the proposed legislation;
  • Government enforcement agencies are simply a training ground for future lobbyists who march to a different drummer.

Mind you, I doubt whether anyone (other than a paid lobbyist) has the tenacity to sit through 33,000 pages of regulations covered by the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare).

Without getting into the merits of which party has the moral high ground, I think it is fair conclude that our system of government is out of control.

Honesty, how can Congress unanimously pass flawed legislation which directly contributed to the deaths of over 60,000 Americans last year?

Stand for the Troops has long argued that the employment merry-go-round between government and lobbyists destroys the very foundations of our democracy.   Wasn’t it President Eisenhower who warned against the evil of the military industrial complex?

Nowhere is criminal collusion any more evident than the dreadful story which documents The Drug Industry’s Triumph Over the DEA.

Over the years, SFTT has highlighted this lethal yet symbiotic relationship between government officials and lobbyists in the following areas:

  • military body armor;
  • military helmets;
  • psychotic drug testing;
  • agent orange coverup;
  • the Department of Veterans Affairs’ (almost everywhere you turn);
  • opioids and PTSD/TBI programs by the VA

I could list another dozen or so conflictive programs, but the fact remains that no one is likely to be held accountable for his or her actions. Furthermore, our government will merrily provide the culprits that fueled the opioid crisis – or stood on the sidelines watching it evolve – with additional money to “fix the problem.”

This closed loop of collective incompetence and culpable negligence is a self-sustaining blight on the lives of so many brave men and women who have served our country so valiantly.   I would like to tell you that the public is fed up, but who do you turn to?

Most sad!


Veterans with PTSD: The VA Way or the Highway

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It is easy to find fault with the Department of Veterans Affairs (“the VA”), particularly when it comes to Veterans with PTSD.

Department of Veterans Affairs

Secretary of Defense, Robert McNamara, tried to employ body count statistics to assess our progress in the war in Vietnam.  Similarly, the VA has erected a statistical house-of-cards to deceive Veterans and their loved that the VA has the answers for Veterans coping with PTSD and TBI.

Like McNamara, the VA “knows what is best for Veterans” and has erected insurmountable statistical barriers to prop up their failed strategies.  In effect, the VA is telling Veterans:  “It is my way or the highway!

Paraphrasing a joke: “The VA uses statistics as a drunk uses a lamppost — For support rather than illumination.”

Sadly, it is no laughing matter when we consider the thousands of combat Veterans suffering from PTSD and TBI.  More importantly, reflect on the often tragic consequences for their families and loved ones.

While Congress and the public continue to be seduced by the steady stream of assurances that the VA provides the best possible care to Veterans with PTSD and TBI, the FACTS tell a far different story.

FAKE NEWS from the VA on Veterans with PTSD

Found below is a video of Dr. David Cifu, Senior TBI Specialist at the VA, testifying before a Congressional Committee:

The VA continues to push a stale and failed agenda that states that the only two effective treatment therapies offered by the VA are:

– Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (“CBT”)and,

– Prolonged Exposure Therapy (“PET”).

As these “therapy” programs have failed miserably according to independent studies (see below), the VA has “coped” with the problem by prescribing a lethal concoction of prescription drugs which treat the symptoms of PTSD rather than deal with the underlying problem.

And we wonder why we have an opioid epidemic in this country?


While Dr. David Cifu continues to entertain a Congressional Committee on the efficacy of the VA’s protocols, experience for yourself one woman’s harrowing experience with the VA which eventually led to husband’s suicide:

The story of Kimi Bivins is not the exception to the type of treatment Veterans with PTSD receive at the VA. Based on many similar stories, the VA is failing our Veterans and their loved ones.

I encourage readers to read Kimi’s harrowing description of what actually takes place at a VA facility.

While the folks at the VA casually dismiss anecdotal stories, VA claims that Veterans receive the best therapy possible is simply not supported by the evidence.

No less of an authority that the National Academies of Sciences (Medical Division) reported in a 2014 study entitled “Treatment for POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER in Military and Veteran Populations,” that CBT and PET barely made a statistical dent in providing Veterans with PTSD any lasting improvement in their condition.

Consider Maj. Ben Richards‘ compelling evidence documenting the failed experiments at the VA in helping Veterans with PTSD.

Standing behind a well-entrenched bureaucracy of statistical inaccuracies and dogma, the VA goes out of its way to discredit other treatment alternatives. Consider this bitter “scientific” debate between Dr. Cifu and Dr. Paul Harch on the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen therapy or HBOT in treating PTSD and TBI.

Finding a Middle Ground for Veterans with PTSD?

With so little known about the brain and how to treat trauma, it seems absurd for the VA to insist that they have all the answers.  The evidence clearly suggests that the VA doesn’t have a clue.

Nevertheless, the VA argues that “alternative therapies” that do not pass scientific scrutiny and FDA approval will not be endorsed by the VA.  As we have seen countless times – from body armor testing to hyperbaric oxygen studies – the DoD uses test protocols that deviate from accepted standards.

If the tests are flawed, one is likely to draw the wrong conclusions!

For the vast majority of Veterans with limited economic means, the VA is effectively making life and death decisions based on flawed testing and a reluctance to embrace other treatment alternatives.

This is probably done with the intent of protecting Veterans from charlatans and snake oil peddlers, but doesn’t it also block Veterans from receiving promising therapies from legitimate sources?

When dogma or “approved” therapies become the LAW, then it seems unlikely that much progress will be made to help our brave Veterans recover their lives.  The VA would do well to encourage Veterans to seek alternative therapies and provide an interactive sounding board for Veterans to voice their opinions on these programs.

Honesty and transparency and a willingness to accept mistakes is the sign of a responsive institution.   Today, the VA hides behind a dogma based on self-delusion and falsehood.


New Study Suggests that Blood Test Can Detect PTSD

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According to a recent Dutch study involving military personnel deployed to Afghanistan, there is evidence to suggest that blood-based miRNAs (Micro RiboNucleic Acids) may serve as “candidate biomarkers for symptoms of PTSD.”

Image from Biochemistry for Medics

A research group from the Netherlands collected blood samples Dutch soldiers before, as well as 6 months after deployment.

Author of the study, Dr. Laurence de Nijs (Maastricht University), states the following:

“We discovered that these small molecules, called miRNAs, are present in different amount in the blood of persons suffering from PTSD compared to trauma-exposed and control subjects without PTSD.

“We identified over 900 different types of these small molecules. 40 of them were regulated differently in people who developed PTSD, whereas there were differences in 27 of the miRNAs in trauma-exposed individuals who did not develop PTSD.

“Interestingly, previous studies have found circulating miRNA levels to be not only correlated with different types of cancer, but also with certain psychiatric disorders including major depressive disorders. These preliminary results of our pilot study suggest that miRNAs might indeed be candidates as predictive blood markers (biomarker) to distinguish between persons at high and low risk of developing PTSD. However, several steps need to be performed before such results can really have an impact on the larger field and in clinical practice. In addition to working towards biomarkers, the results may also provide novel information about the biological mechanisms underlying the development of PTSD”.

While more studies are required to confirm the results of this study, it does suggest that blood-testing could help identify risk factors for susceptibility to PTSD for troops scheduled for deployment.

It is difficult to generalize from such a limited test sample but clearly, evidence based markers seem to be a far better way to test the incidence of PTSD and brain trauma than the simplistic PTSD screening questionnaires currently employed by the Department of Veterans Affairs (“the VA”).

There continues to be much promising research into preventing and curing PTSD and TBI, but sadly the VA continues to insist on failed therapy programs while sponsoring research studies than focus on helping Veterans cope with the symptoms of brain trauma rather that provide meaningful solutions.  The cannabis and ecstasy studies suggest that the VA feels far more comfortable dispensing prescription drugs rather than provide Veterans with a meaningful path to full recovery.

While thousands of Veterans continue to suffer from combat-related brain trauma, the VA has done precious little to help these Veterans and their families cope with this debilitating problem.  While the VA insists that they are doing everything possible to help Veterans with PTSD and TBI, the story of Eric Bivins and countless other brave warriors paints a far different picture of what Veterans can really expect at the VA.


SFTT Military News Highlights: Week Ending Sep 8, 2017

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Found below are a few military news items that caught my attention this past week. I am hopeful that the titles and short commentary will encourage SFTT readers to click on the embedded links to read more on subjects that may be of interest to them.

If you have subjects of topical interest, please do not hesitate to reach out. Contact SFTT at info@sftt.org.

China Sends Military Warning to North Korea
As tensions continue to mount following North Korea’s latest nuclear test, the Chinese military has conducted another drill near the Korean Peninsula. According to the South China Morning Post (SCMP), a Hong Kong-based publication, on Tuesday a Chinese ground unit practiced shooting down simulated low flying missiles over Bohai Bay. Bohai Bay is “ the innermost gulf of the Yellow Sea between China and North Korea,” the report noted. Although few details were given, including which defense systems were used, Chinese websites indicated the test sought to simulate a surprise attack in a realistic, warfighting scenario.  Read more . . .

U.S. “Military Options” for North Korea are all “Terrible”
Despite President Donald Trump’s continued talk of military options in the North Korean standoff, his national security chiefs told lawmakers that they are trying to tighten the diplomatic and economic noose around the Hermit Kingdom, because there are no good offensive military options—and the defensive measures are far from foolproof. “It was a sober discussion,” said one person briefed on the closed-door session of senators with Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, Defense chief Jim Mattis, Director of National Intelligence Daniel Coats, and Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Joseph Dunford. “Military options were just described as ‘terrible,’” he said.  Read more . . .

Department of Veterans Affairs

GAO Finds VA Insurance Enrollment Standards Lacking
The Department of Veterans Affairs is one of the largest healthcare organizations that provides health benefits, but their enrollment standards and processes lead to delays and errors, according to a new report from the Government Accountability Office (GAO). GAO analyzed veteran enrollment in VA medical centers (VAMCs) across the country and found that enrollment staff frequently did not process veterans’ enrollment applications within the timeliness standard of 5 business days. These issues were found both at VA’s Health Eligibility Center (HEC), the VA’s central enrollment processing center, and within local VAMCs that also process enrollment applications. The HEC experienced an enrollment error rate of 12 percent. The VAMCs analyzed in the report had a 27 percent error rate.  Read more . . .

Top Military Officials Cite Troubling Problems in Dealing with TBI
Top current and former officials in the U.S. Military are raising the alarm over the disturbing combination of high rates of Traumatic Brain Injury in the armed forces and a lack of public policy solutions to adequately address the problem. Researchers are only now getting their arms around the magnitude of the class of injuries that are difficult to treat and have affected an estimated 400,000 service members since the September 11th attacks in 2001.  Read more . . .

Congress Debates “Exit Oath” to Curb Veteran Suicides
Congress is currently debating a bill that attempts to curb high rates of veteran suicide by giving military members the choice to take an “Oath of Exit.” In this oath, veterans would state that they won’t take their own lives after leaving their post. The Oath of Exit Act is a section of the proposed 2018 version of the National Defense Authorization Act, which has already passed through the House of Representatives. The oath is a voluntary pledge for exiting service members in which the veteran promises to “not bring harm to [themselves] without speaking to [their] fellow veterans first.” Mast believes that because integrity and honor are significant to servicemen and women, if they pledge to do something, they will follow through. However, suicide and military mental health experts like Craig Bryan, an assistant professor in clinical psychology at the University of Utah, think the bill could do just the opposite. In Bryan’s study, “Effect of crisis response planning vs. contracts for safety on suicide risk in U.S. Army Soldiers: A randomized clinical trial,” published in the January 2017 “Journal of Affective Disorders,” he found that “contracts for safety” do not lower suicide risk among U.S. soldiers, but “crisis response plans” do.  Read more . . .

Blood Test Suggests Combat-Related PTSD 
Individuals affected with PTSD (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder) demonstrate changes in microRNA (miRNA) molecules associated with gene regulation. A controlled study, involving military personnel on deployment to a combat zone in Afghanistan, provided evidence for the role of blood-based miRNAs as candidate biomarkers for symptoms of PTSD. This may offer an approach towards screening for symptoms of PTSD, and holds promise for understanding other trauma-related psychiatric disorders. Limitations of the study are that this was a small pilot study, and the findings need to be validated, extended and confirmed. First results will be presented at the ECNP conference in Paris.  Read more . . .

Drop me an email at info@sftt.org if you believe that there are other subjects that are newsworthy.

Feel you should do more to help our brave men and women who wear the uniform or our Veterans? Consider donating to Stand For The Troops.


Veterans Account for 20% of U.S. Suicides

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Military suicides, particularly among Veterans, show no signs of abating.  Despite recent efforts by Secretary of Shulkin of the Department of Veterans Affairs (“the VA”), the “silent wounds of war” follow our Veterans into civilian life.

Veteran Suicides

(U.S. Army photo by Stephen Baker)

In a most informative report published by CNN, Veteran suicides account for roughly 20% of all suicides in the United States.

SFTT has reported on this disturbing trend for several years, but little has been done to curb Veteran suicides. Our analysis of this dreadful situation – covered amply in previous articles – may be summarized as follows :

1. PTSD and TBI are the Smoking Guns of Veteran Suicide

Veterans with complex PTSD or PTSD and TBI are more than 25 times more likely to commit suicide than their veteran peers, according the National Center for Biotechnology Information (“NCBI”).

2.  The VA is Currently Not Able to Effectively Treat Veterans with PTSD

Like the NFL’s denial of culpability, the VA continues to insist that Cognitive Process Therapy (“CPT”) and Prolonged Exposure Therapy (“PE”) help reverse the trends of PTSD and TBI.  This is patently untrue as described in more detail below.

The VA’s top-tier Specialized Intensive PTSD treatment Programs (“SIPPs”) failed to achieve clinically significant improvement in PTSD symptoms after an average 46-day program of treatment at an average cost of $23,578 per veteran. Average change in PCL-M scores was 5.7 points and “most program graduates met the criteria for clinically significant PTSD after discharge….” according to Institute of Medicine of the National Academies or IOM 2014 study, p.100.

“However, the outcomes from RCTs suggest that only a minority of veterans can be expected to lose their PTSD diagnosis as a result of getting CPT or PE, arguable administered in an ideal fashion…” (p.49) 2/3s retain PTSD diagnosis.

“In the RCTs conducted to date, with one exception, mean symptom scores at the end of treatment or at the latest follow-up (when available) indicated that PTSD symptoms were still substantial .” (p.49)

“Attaining high end-state functioning may be the exception rather than the rule.” (p.49)

The VA continues to treat the symptoms of PTSD and TBI with potentially lethal prescription drugs rather than use other proven therapy programs.  In fact, many current programs (i.e. cannabis) funded by the VA focus on treating symptoms rather than the underlying causes of PTSD and TBI.

3. The VA has Shown Little Inclination to Understand the Causes of PTSD

The “evidence-based” treatments currently deployed by the VA and DOD have little actual evidence supporting their efficacy in treating combat trauma and the existing evidence shows these treatments are generally ineffective.

The IOD concluded in 2014 that “[N]either department [DoD and VA] knows whether it is providing effective, appropriate, or adequate care for PTSD.

The VA insists that this is not the case, but many other studies have reached similar conclusion regarding the standard therapies used by the VA.

Specifically, in randomized controlled trials of “evidence-based” treatments in military PTSD “. . . mean post-treatment scores for CPT and prolonged exposure therapy remained at or above clinical criteria for PTSD, and approximately two-thirds of patients receiving CPT or prolonged exposure retained their diagnosis after treatment.  Symptom remission was rare.”   (Steenkamp, et. al., p. 489)

4.  SFTT has Assembled a World Class Medical Task Force to Identify and Deploy Effective Treatment for TBI and PTSD

Despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary, the VA continues to march to a drummer of its own choice insisting that Veterans are receiving the best care possible.  As SFTT will demonstrate in the next couple of weeks, support for Veterans diagnosed with PTSD (and their supportive families) is abysmal.

Veterans recognize the limitations of the VA and are seeking alternative therapy programs.  SFTT has assembled a world class Medical Task Force to identify promising new technologies and recommend proven treatment programs.

While some of these therapy programs have been around for years with proven success stories, others are more experimental in nature.  There is no “silver bullet” and each Veteran may respond differently to a specific program.  Nevertheless, it seems far better than the hype rather than substance of VA programs.

Visit the SFTT website for more information on promising new therapies to treat PTSD and TBI and do consider supporting the SFTT mission through a kind DONATION.

Veterans and those who serve our country need a helping hand.

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