Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) by Grady Birdsong

Posted by:

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy HBOT Grady BirdsongGrady Birdsong, a USMC Veteran from Vietnam, has co-authored a book with Col. Robert Fisher (USMC – Ret) that deals with hyperbaric oxygen therapy (“HBOT”) entitled “The Miracle Workers of South Boulder Road:  Healing the Signature Wounds of War.”

The book is a 2016 Best Book Awards finalist and details how HBOT helps reverse the damage of traumatic brain injury.   In a must-hear interview, Grady Birdsong explains his experience with HBOT (and now his advocacy)  to Jerry Fabyanic on his “Rabbithole” program at KYGT in the Idaho Springs/Denver area.

Grady Birdsong spikes up interest in hyperbaric oxygen therapy with a down-to-earth radio interview with KYGT Radio with the following introduction:

In our advocacy campaign to make this clinic and treatment known, I had the good fortune of being interviewed on KYGT Radio over the weekend by Jerry Fabyanic on his “Rabbithole” program in a mountain town close to Denver. He has so graciously provided me with a link to that interview about our book. We most gratefully appreciate his voice and his audience at KYGT in the Idaho Springs/Denver area. Likewise my close friend and veteran Marine, David T. “Red Dog” Roberts, 1st Bn, 4th Marines, Delta Company in Vietnam and his Doc, Corpsman, Kenneth R. Walker produced two songs that are complementary to this advocacy of healing the signature wounds of war. You will hear them in the interview.

CLICK HERE for the entire and very educational 50+ minute podcast.

SFTT has long recommended the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy or HBOT to treat Veterans with the symptoms of PTSD and TBI.  There are many studies that prove conclusively that the supervised application of HBOT helps improve brain function and restores cognitive abilities.

While Mr. Birdsong points out the many restorative benefits of HBOT, follow-up supervision is recommended to help deal with some of the symptoms of PTSD.

Sadly, in many online forums dealing with the ravages of PTSD, most military families are unaware of the benefits of regular supervised “dives” in HBOT chambers.  I would argue that the Department of Veterans Affairs has purposely discredited the use of HBOT in treating PTSD and TBI to promote their own failed agenda and the prevalent use of addictive prescription drugs.

One only needs to listen to the likes of Dr. David Cifu, Senior TBI Advisor to the Department of Veterans Affairs, to see the cynicism and blatant disregard for clinical evidence adopted by the VA against HBOT.   One can only speculate why, but HBOT seems to offer Veterans a far better solution than the cocktail of drugs served up by the VA.

Found below is a very moving and instructional video by Grady Birdsong of a young woman who “recovered her life” from the “signature wounds of war” with the use of HBOT:

Thanks to the effort of Grady and many other dedicated Veterans, we can all join together and help Veterans reclaim their lives. It is simply the right thing to do!

Nevertheless, the benefits of HBOT will not be widespread until the restrictive and self-serving barriers to this treatment are adopted and encouraged by the VA. Secretary Shulkin of the VA wants change to occur at the VA.  What better way to demonstrate his commitment to reducing Veteran suicides than by embracing HBOT to treat PTSD?

If you want to learn more about how HBOT can be used in treating PTSD and TBI, I suggest that you purchase The Miracle Workers of South Boulder Road:  Healing the Signature Wounds of War.  Share it with family and friends to encourage them not to give up hope on our brave Veterans.

For those tired of watching the lives of loved one end in pain, depression and hopelessness; write Dr. Shulkin and members of Congress and ask for action.  Don’t allow naysayers and self-serving bureaucrats like Dr. Cifu block Veteran access to HBOT.

0

SFTT News: Highlights for Week Ending June 14, 2017

Posted by:

Found below are a few military news items that caught my attention this past week. I am hopeful that the titles and short commentary will encourage SFTT readers to click on the embedded links to read more on subjects that may be of interest to them.

If you have subjects of topical interest, please do not hesitate to reach out. Contact SFTT.

Taliban

Russia Claims to Have Killed ISIS Leader
Russia’s military said on Friday that it was looking into whether one of its airstrikes in the Syrian desert had killed Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the self-declared caliph of the Islamic State.In a statement, the Defense Ministry said that the Russian Air Force struck a meeting of Islamic State leaders on May 28 outside Raqqa, Syria, the group’s de facto capital, possibly killing Mr. Baghdadi. The statement offered no explanation for the two-week delay in publicizing the airstrike. And it was also not clear whether the Russian military had known in advance that Mr. Baghdadi was at the gathering, or had learned of this possibility only after the strike was carried out.  Read more . . .

Trump Restrictions on Cuban Trade Said to Hurt Cybersecurity
The prospect of tightened sanctions has many Cubans on edge, concerned about the impact on the economy and overall relations between the countries. For Lt. Col. Rodriguez, it could mean curtailing what the Cubans tout as successful sharing of intelligence, made possible as a result of the diplomatic relations established by President Obama. “The progress that we’ve made could be set back,” Rodriguez said.  Read more . . .

Help on the Way for Military Caregivers?
Former Sen. Elizabeth Dole (R-N.C.) and actor Ryan Phillippe visited Capitol Hill on Wednesday to testify in the first major Senate hearing on veteran caregiver issues in several years. “I’ve heard directly from the military caregivers who are in need,” Phillippe told The Hill. “And those experiences stick with you. They stay with your heart. And I think bringing attention to these issues is huge.” The foundation commissioned a report from the Rand Corporation, also released on Wednesday, which provides a blueprint for necessary research and support for caregivers. “Rand pointed out the number of areas where there were gaps in services, and the current legislation fills those gaps,” Dole told The Hill. “Now we need the research to get ready for the future.”   Read more . . .

How Russia Targets the U.S. Military
In recent years, intelligence experts say, Russia has dramatically increased its “active measures” — a form of political warfare that includes disinformation, propaganda and compromising leaders with bribes and blackmail — against the United States. Thus far, congressional committees, law enforcement investigations and press scrutiny have focused on Kremlin leader Vladimir Putin’s successful efforts to disrupt the American political process. But a review of the available evidence and the accounts of Kremlin watchers make clear that the Russian government is using the same playbook against other pillars of American society, foremost among them the military. Experts warn that effort, which has received far less attention, has the potential to hobble the ability of the armed forces to clearly assess Putin’s intentions and effectively counter future Russian aggression.  Read more . . .

Department of Veterans Affairs

Congress Passes Veterans Affairs Accountability Act
Congress approved long-sought legislation Tuesday to make firing employees easier for the Department of Veterans Affairs, part of an effort urged by President Trump to fix a struggling agency serving millions of veterans. The bill will make it easier for VA employees, including executives, to be fired by lowering the standard of evidence required to “remove, demote or suspend” someone for poor performance or misconduct. It also gives whistleblowers more protections, including preventing the VA from removing an employee with an open whistleblower case.  The House cleared the bill, 368-55, replacing an earlier version that Democrats had criticized as overly unfair to workers. The Senate passed the bipartisan legislation by voice vote last week. It will go to Mr. Trump later this week for his signature.  Read more . . .

Alcohol and Substance Abuse May Worsen PTSD Symptoms
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) refers to a disorder wherein a person may fail to recover after experiencing a terrifying event. It can trigger anxiety and dreadful memories of the incident. Veterans or people from the armed forces may be at a higher risk of developing PTSD as they are often exposed to life-threatening experiences and tough combat. Military services and many other local organisations offer help to veterans to overcome this disorder. However, sometimes they may turn to alcohol and substance abuse to numb distress and ease the anxiety. But a new study, published in the journal of Traumatic Stress, indicates that such risky behaviour may worsen the symptoms of PTSD.  Read more . . .

Drop me an email at info@sftt.org if you believe that there are other subjects that are newsworthy.

Feel you should do more to help our brave men and women who wear the uniform or our Veterans? Consider donating to Stand For The Troops

0

Veterans with PTSD Knew that VA Opioid Prescriptions Were Wrong

Posted by:

After many lives of many brave Veterans with PTSD have been lost, the State of Ohio has finally taken action against pharmaceutical drug companies for hyping opioids.

Opioids

According to the New York Times reporter,  

The State of Ohio filed a lawsuit on Wednesday against the pharmaceutical industry over the opioid epidemic, accusing several drug companies of conducting marketing campaigns that misled doctors and patients about the danger of addiction and overdose.

Defendants in the case include Purdue Pharma, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries, Johnson & Johnson, Endo Pharmaceuticals, Allergan and others.

Purdue, the maker of OxyContin, a time-release opioid, released a statement saying, “We share the attorney general’s concerns about the opioid crisis and we are committed to working collaboratively to find solutions,” and calling the company “an industry leader in the development of abuse-deterrent technology.”

As most Veterans treated by the Department of Veterans Affairs (“the VA”) are aware, opioids were the prescription of choice for Veterans suffering from PTSD.

Despite overwhelming evidence available to the VA and the Department of Defense (the DOD) that this was probably not a wise course of action, the VA persisted in treating the symptoms of PTSD with dangerous prescription drugs.

It is only now with opioid and drug addiction ravishing communities across the United States that some local and State governments are beginning to take action.  In the interim, thousands of Veterans with PTSD have suffered through over-medication with opioids by doctors at the VA.

More to the point, the VA continues to insist on dated and ineffective treatment programs for Veterans with PTSD and TBI.   Under the inept counsel of Dr. David Cifu, these same treatment therapies continue at the VA today.

It is difficult to predict when this tragic saga will end, but clearly there are no indications that the VA plans to make any substantial changes to current programs.  As such our brave Veterans will continue to receive the same flawed therapy and, most likely, a healthy supply of prescription drugs to mask the symptoms.

Where are our leaders in Congress and leaders within the VA to put an end to this tragedy?  Cynical though I am, I have a difficult time believing that Big Pharma political campaign donations would be the reason.

0

First Steps to Overhaul the Department of Veterans Affairs

Posted by:

Dr. David Shulkin continues to impress by tackling some rather entrenched “special interest” groups within the Department of Veterans Affairs (“the VA”):

– Personnel;

– Infrastructure

Earlier this week, VA Secretary Shulkin informed a Congress that he was considering closing some 1,100 underutilized VA facilities.  The Associated Press reports that:

Shulkin said the VA had identified more than 430 vacant buildings and 735 that he described as underutilized, costing the federal government $25 million a year. He said the VA would work with Congress in prioritizing buildings for closure and was considering whether to follow a process the Pentagon had used in recent decades to decide which of its underused military bases to shutter, known as Base Realignment and Closure, or BRAC.

“Whether BRAC is a model that we should take a look, we’re beginning that discussion with members of Congress,” Shulkin told a House appropriations subcommittee. “We want to stop supporting our use of maintenance of buildings we don’t need, and we want to reinvest that in buildings we know have capital needs.”

Last week, President Trump signed an Executive Order protecting VA whistleblowers from retaliation in a quest by the VA to shed incompetent employees.

Department of Veterans Affairs

While these measures may seem rather insignificant given the overall size and reach of the VA, they could mark an important change in the direction of the VA to help respond to the needs of Veterans.

The VA has evolved into a mammoth organization intent on serving the needs of all Veterans and their families.  Roughly 60% of the VA’s $180 billion budget (2017 budget) is allocated to mandatory benefits programs.

The VA’s discretionary budget of $78.7 billion is allocated to a variety of Veteran services,  but by far, is the the $65 billion allocated to medical care facilities.   Despite regular reports of shortcomings at VA facilities, the Rand Corporation recently (2016) reported that “the Veterans Affairs health care system generally performs better than or similar to other health care systems on providing safe and effective care to patients.”

While it appears that many Veterans – quite possibly the vast majority – receive quality health services from the VA, many Veterans complain about the timeliness and quality of service provided to them.

Like other healthcare providers in the private sector, the VA has determined what health events are covered, the type of coverage provided and where the health services are administered.

One program that has come under particular attack is the Choice Program, which gives Veterans access to medical services in the private sector if the VA can’t dispense services within 30 days or a VA facility is not located within 40 miles of the Veteran.

At his confirmation hearings, now VA Secretary David Shulkin, requested that Congress expand the coverage of the Choice program and eliminate many of its administrative constraints.  Needless to say, changes in the Choice program would certainly provide a greater number of Veterans with access to private sector care.

In cases of emergency, even minor improvements to the Choice program could be of major benefits to Veterans.

Nevertheless, these changes do not provide Veterans with access to alternative therapy programs not currently approved by the VA.  As SFTT has reported on numerous occasions, PTSD is currently treated with demonstrably ineffective “approved” treatment procedures while far better and less-intrusive programs like hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) are widely used with success throughout the world.

In effect, there are a number of activities within the VA that can best be performed by third-party services.  In fact, integrating these services with community resources may prove to be more of a long term benefit to the Veteran and his or her family.

Stand for the Troops remains hopeful that Secretary Shulkin and the dedicated employees of the VA will find the right balance in helping Veterans recover their lives.

0

Whistleblowers and the Department of Veterans Affairs

Posted by:

On April 27th, President Trump signed an Executive Order to create the Office of Accountability and Whistleblower Protection within the Department of Veterans Affairs (“the VA”).

According to the AP, VA Secretary David Shulkin said the office will help identify “barriers” that make it difficult for the department to fire or reassign bad employees. Another function of the office will be to help shield whistleblowers from retaliation.

To many, it may seem surprising that a new office within the VA is required to protect “whistleblowers,” since private and public whistleblowers have long been afforded protection under the Whistleblower Protection Act of 1989.

Clearly, additional protection is needed if doctors like Dr. Dale Klein can be relegated to an empty room for bringing VA abuse to the attention of the Inspector General.  Found below is a report for Fox News:

Dr. Dale Klein may be the highest-paid U.S. government employee who literally does nothing while he’s on the clock. A highly rated pain management specialist at the Southeast Missouri John J. Pershing V.A., Klein is paid $250,000 a year to work with veterans, but instead of helping those who served their country, he sits in a small office and does nothing. All day. Every day.

“I sit in a chair and I look at the walls,” the doctor said of his typical workday. “It feels like solitary confinement.”

A double board certified physician and Yale University fellow, Klein said the Department of Veterans Affairs (V.A.) took away his patients and privileges almost a year ago after, he alleges, he blew the whistle on secret wait-lists and wait-time manipulation at the V.A. in Poplar Bluff, Mo., as well as his suspicion that some veterans were reselling their prescriptions on the black market.

While one would like to be optimistic that the new “Whistleblower Office” within the VA would help improved efficiency within the VA, I suspect that there are far too many institutional barriers to be overcome in this mammoth organization.

Department of Veterans Affairs

Size Matters at the Department of Veterans Affairs

The VA’s simple mission laid down by President Abraham Lincoln is “to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan.”

Needless to say, each person has his or her interpretation of what that VA mission entails, but over time the VA has laid on layers of responsibility to fulfill that mission.   In the military, we often refer to that as “mission creep.”

In effect, the VA – whether pressured by Congress, the President or their own Administration – have taken on responsibilities that may or may not be what was originally intended under President Lincoln’s promise.

More importantly, the VA has centralized most functions under its umbrella to administer to the needs of Veterans.

Employing some 350,000 people and many outside consultants, the VA administers health and benefit programs to millions of Veterans.  In economic terms, one might characterize the VA as a monopoly.

While many of the services provided by the VA are excellent, it would be unrealistic to expect that ALL services are effective.

In fact, the IG, internal VA audits and the IG have reported many irregularities at the VA.  Unmanned Crisis Call Centers, unacceptable patient “wait times” and the heavy reliance on prescription drugs all contribute to public wariness and distrust of the VA.   More importantly, many Veterans reject the services provided by the VA.

SFTT has long argued that the VA is far too large to succeed on every front without compromising their main mission.  Shortly after Dr. David Shulkin was appointed Secretary of the VA, we wrote:

NO AMOUNT OF MONEY or CHANGE IN LEADERSHIP or ENACTMENT OF NEW LEGISLATION will bring about A MORE RESPONSIVE VA.

The VA has become a bureaucracy that answers only to itself and is not responsive to the needs of Veterans.  Frankly, the VA has lost its way and very little will change unless the VA is broken down into far smaller manageable components.

While smaller components of the VA will invariably fail, A SMALLER AND LESS CENTRALIZED VA WON’T COMPROMISE THE FULL MISSION.  

VA Whistleblowers and David Cox

Dr. Shulkin and others clearly realize that there are serious problems of accountability within the VA.  The April 27, 2017 Executive Order is designed to help “weed out” waste and inefficiencies within the VA.

J. David Cox

J. David Cox

Despite much needed reform within the largely ungovernable VA, I suspect that  J. David Cox, President of the American Federation of Government Employees, will continue to run a destabilizing campaign to block any meaningful reform.

We admire the courage of “whistleblowers,” but Veterans shouldn’t expect great changes considering the entrenched positions of David Cox and his henchmen.

It is reassuring to see Dr. Shulkin take action to confront the serious problems within the VA.  We wish him success in his endeavors and hope that he receives much needed support from our elected leaders to bring radical reform to the VA.

0

SFTT Military News: Week Ending Apr 21, 2017

Posted by:

Found below are a few military news items that caught my attention this past week. I am hopeful that the titles and short commentary will encourage SFTT readers to click on the embedded links to read more on subjects that may be of interest to them.

If you have subjects of topical interest, please do not hesitate to reach out. Contact SFTT.

Kim - North Korea

Grim Military Options Available in Confrontation with North Korea
Three weeks before becoming president, Donald Trump weighed in on the threat of North Korea developing a nuclear warhead capable of reaching the U.S.: “It won’t happen,” he vowed on Twitter. Now planners are contemplating what a U.S. strike to prevent that development might look like, and the options are grim.Analysts estimate North Korea may now possess between 10 and 25 nuclear weapons, with launch vehicles, air force jets, troops and artillery scattered across the country, hidden in caves and massed along the border with South Korea. That’s on top of what the U.S. estimates to be one of the world’s largest chemical weapons stockpiles, a biological weapons research program and an active cyberwarfare capability.  Read more . . .

New Russian Military Base in the Arctic
Visitors to the Russian defense ministry website can now take a “virtual tour” of a new military base in a remote region of the Arctic. The Arctic Trefoil permanent base is in Franz Josef Land, a huge ice-covered, desolate archipelago. The Russian military sees the resource-rich Arctic as a key strategic region. President Vladimir Putin visited the new base, on Alexandra Land, last month. It is built on stilts – to help withstand the extreme cold – and will house 150 personnel on 18-month tours of duty. Winter temperatures typically plunge to minus 40C.  Read more . . .

Head Injuries Can Alter Hundreds of Genes
Head injuries can adversely affect hundreds of genes in the brain that put people at high risk for diseases including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, post-traumatic stress disorder, stroke, ADHD, autism, depression and schizophrenia, life scientists report. The researchers have identified for the first time potential master genes which they believe control hundreds of other genes that are linked to many neurological and psychiatric disorders.  Read more . . .

Veterans with PTSD

New Study Suggests “Post-Traumatic Growth” after PTSD
A new study of military veterans who went through trauma finds that those veterans who have related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are also more likely to experience ‘post-traumatic growth’ — such as an increased appreciation of life, awareness of new possibilities and enhanced inner strength.   Read more . . .

New Bill May Provide Veterans with Greater Private Care Health Options
President Donald Trump signed a bill Wednesday to temporarily extend a program that lets some veterans seek medical care in the private sector, part of an effort by the president to deliver on a campaign promise. The extension will give Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin time to develop a more comprehensive plan to allow veterans to more easily go outside the VA health system for care. Under the bill Trump signed into law, the VA will be allowed to continue operating its Choice Program until the funding runs out, which is expected early next year. The program was scheduled to expire on Aug. 7 with nearly $1 billion left over.  Read more . . .

New VA Facility in Waco, Texas Targets Brain Injuries
Waco’s Doris Miller Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center now can provide the gold standard in research and treatment for brain injuries suffered on the battlefield with Thursday’s opening of a 53,000-square-foot facility for the VISN 17 Center of Excellence for Research on Returning War Veterans that sprawls across three floors of Building 93. More than 150 people attended a grand-opening ceremony to mark the occasion, and U.S. Rep. Bill Flores said the Waco VA will become a hub for dealing with the invisible wounds of post traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury that have become part of this country’s global war on terror.  Read more . . .

Drop me an email at info@sftt.org if you believe that there are other subjects that are newsworthy.

Feel you should do more to help our brave men and women who wear the uniform or our Veterans? Consider donating to Stand For The Troops

0

Opioid Abuse: Department of Veterans Affairs Culpability?

Posted by:

While many families will be celebrating Easter today, I am quite sure that their thoughts will turn to a family member or friend who were among the 52,000 that died of a drug overdose last year.

By comparison, there were only 33,000 traffic fatalities over the same period.  These statistics suggest that substance abuse plays a far greater threat to our society than careless driving.

In an excellent 5-part series by FOX News entitled “Drugged, Inside the Opioid Crisis,” the network explores the devastating impact of opioid abuse in towns across the United States.

In fact, the FOX network claims that 4 out of 5 overdose fatalities can be traced to the initial use of prescription drugs for pain medication.   It is clear that prescription painkillers have caused many innocent victims to become dependent on more lethal drugs like heroin.

Temazepam_10mg_tablets-1

As Stand for The Troops (“SFTT”) has been reporting for several years, Veterans suffering from PTSD have been regularly over-served with a concoction of drugs – primarily opioids – to allow them to cope with pain and other issues.

If there was any doubt about the culpability of the Department of Veterans Affairs (“the VA”) in addicting our Veterans to painkillers rather than treat them, I suggest that you watch the video below:

With 20-20 hindsight most everyone can be on the “right side of history,”  but our Veterans, the VA and Congressional oversight committees have known that opioids was not the proper way to treat Veterans suffering from PTSD and TBI.

Dr. David Cifu:  A State of Denial at the VA

Unfortunately, VA protocols to treat PTSD as articulated by Dr. David Cifu, the senior TBI specialist in the Department of Veterans Affairs’ Veterans Health Administration, have resulted in few lasting benefits for Veterans with PTSD.  Paraphrasing Dr. David Cifu,  “the worse thing you can do for someone with PTSD is not to press them back into action as quickly as possible.  At the VA, we prescribe drugs for those in pain or suffering trauma.”

Indeed, there is no compelling evidence that the VA has improved the lives of Veterans suffering from PTSD or TBI.  

The VA continues to push its stale and failed agenda that states that the only two effective treatment therapies offered by the VA are:

– Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and,

– Prolonged Exposure Therapy.

To see how badly the VA has failed our Veterans, one only needs to listen to a detailed explanation by Maj. Ben Richards citing his experience with the VA and a summary of failed patient outcomes at the VA. Watch the first two minutes to see Maj. Richards refute all VA claims that they are dealing with the problem effectively.

Conversation with a Veteran Drug Abuse Specialist

Several years ago, I had the opportunity to visit a Community Center in northern New York that was working with high-risk Veterans suffering from PTSD and TBI.  During this visit, I encountered a Drug Abuse Specialist, who had been rescued from addiction through the Veteran Court System.

What he told me shocked me.

– Well over 90% of Veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan suffer from substance abuse issues;

– Veterans are well aware that opioids don’t work and have major side-effects (i.e. suicidal thoughts) when combined with other prescription drugs provided by the VA;

– Rather than flush prescription drugs down the toilet, the drug of choice, OxyContin, was pulverized into powder and sold on the black market to civilian drug users;

– A leading supplier of OxyContin to the VA had its sales of the drug fall by more than 60% when Congress forced them to repackage the pills in a gel composite so it couldn’t be sold as a powder on the black market;

– This same pharmaceutical company petitioned Congress to reinstate OxyContin in pill form citing that “it is more effective than gel;”

– VA prescribed drugs don’t provide Veterans with a meaningful road to full recovery.

Sadly, I don’t believe the situation has changed significantly in recent years.

Opioid Abuse in the United States

The magnitude of the addiction problem in the United States can’t be underestimated.  Consider these staggering statistics from the American Society for Addiction Medicine (ASAM):

– Drug overdose is the leading cause of accidental death in the US, with 52,404 lethal drug overdoses in 2015. Opioid addiction is driving this epidemic, with 20,101 overdose deaths related to prescription pain relievers, and 12,990 overdose deaths related to heroin in 2015.

–  The overdose death rate in 2008 was nearly four times the 1999 rate; sales of prescription pain relievers in 2010 were four times those in 1999; and the substance use disorder treatment admission rate in 2009 was six times the 1999 rate.

– In 2012, 259 million prescriptions were written for opioids, which is more than enough to give every American adult their own bottle of pills.

– Four in five new heroin users started out misusing prescription painkillers.

– 94% of respondents in a 2014 survey of people in treatment for opioid addiction said they chose to use heroin because prescription opioids were “far more expensive and harder to obtain.

Opioids for Veterans: Deja Vu All Over Again

It’s often said that the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different outcome.  As previous articles from SFTT have argued, the VA is in a rut and will continue to pursue well-meaning but demonstrably ineffective procedures to help Veterans with PTSD.  Most tragic.

While one would think that there is compelling evidence for the VA to follow in a different tack, I read a few days ago that OxyContin is again being tested to treat PTSD and substance abuse.

How much longer to our Veterans need to suffer from the VA bureaucracy and autocratic controls that remains largely unresponsive to their very real needs?   Based on the evidence, it seems that the VA management philosophy of benign neglect will continue to persist.  How sad!

Easter Advice from Veteran Wives Who Care

On Facebook, I recently came across this wonderful advice from Wives of PTSD Vets and Military.  I quote this useful advice below:

“If there is anything you have learned from your experience that you would tell those who are new to PTSD and the VA, what would it be?

Just A FEW of mine would be:

1. Staying on top of the VA and the veteran’s care is a full time job by itself. It is important to stay on top of it or they will fall through the cracks. Don’t wait for the VA to call. You call the VA.
2. Always research the severe side effects, and interactions of ALL medications including over the counter.
3. Always be aware of their moods, anniversaries (if possible), and seek help if you see them slipping downward.
4. Have a safety plan.
5. Find ways to communicate with your spouse. Use of code words, safety words etc are extremely helpful for us. Our new one is trust tree, which means either one of has something important to say, and the other one can’t judge, flip out, or start an argument. So far, it’s working. I’ll make a post later for it.

These are only a few off the top of my head. I have a lot more in depth ones that I will write about after while. What things have you learned or did you wish you knew when starting this roller coaster ride called PTSD?”

While one can only hope that this pragmatic spouse finds a sympathetic ear at the VA, “effective treatment” still seems out of reach.

In summary, may our brave Veterans and their families and friends get the HONEST SUPPORT THEY DESERVE.

0

2017 Veterans Affairs Budget: Breaking Down the Numbers

Posted by:

Politicians from both sides of the political spectrum tend to use budget data in much the same way a magician conjures a rabbit out of a top hat.  Sadly, the Department of Veterans Affairs (the VA”) budget – in the hands of a politician – often becomes an instrument of posturing for voters rather than a management tool to efficiently allocate limited funds and resources to our Veteran population.

In analyzing the 2017 VA Budget, it is useful to analyze a few broad parameters to help pinpoint the “macro” issues.  Certainly, the VA can operate more efficiently, but this assumes that the VA management is committed to insure that Veterans receive the best care possible.

Unfortunately, management efficiency within the VA is beyond the scope of this very preliminary analysis of the 2017 VA budget.

SFTT’s focus is on how well – in “macro” terms – the 2017 VA budget actually benefits Veterans.

Discretionary vs Mandated Spending at the VA

According to the Department of Veterans Affairs, “The President’s 2017 Budget includes $182.3 billion for VA in 2017.  This includes $78.7 billion in discretionary resources and $103.6 billion in mandatory funding.  Our (sic the VA) discretionary budget request represents an increase of $3.6 billion, or 4.9 percent, over the 2016 enacted level.”

Department of Veterans Affairs

In effect, discretionary spending at the VA has been spared the axe of many other government programs.  As stated above, discretionary spending at the VA is projected to increase 4.9%.  This analysis will focus only on discretionary spending to determine whether the proposed increase actually benefits Veterans.

Discretionary spending represents only 43% of the total VA budget, while some 57% is allocated toward “mandatory programs” that support Veterans who meet predetermined criteria.   Needless to say, eligibility for Veterans to tap into those “mandatory” programs are largely determined by the VA. Many question the rationale and the process used by VA administrators to determine eligibility and the level of compensation.

Analyzing the Discretionary Spending Increases at the VA

All too often we confuse an “increased budget” with better service or improved end-user outcomes.  In the case of the VA the “end-user” is a Veteran who avails himself or herself of VA services.

To explain this apparent paradox, I cite the following example.  For instance, if the entire 4.9% budget increase is allocated to existing staff, then Veterans will receive NO better service or end-user outcomes UNLESS operating efficiencies occur within the VA.  In effect, you are relying on the VA’s NEW management to perform a better job than their predecessors rather than expecting the increased budget allocation to improve the lives of Veterans.

The same logic could be applied to price increases for drugs, third-party consulting services and other discretionary contractual obligations.

The budget is cleverly designed to avoid breaking out staff salary expenses.  Instead it focuses on programs such as “Benefits Claims Processing,” “Medical Care, and “Information Technology.”  Therefore,  it is rather difficult (if not impossible) to breakout budgeted expenses to obtain a better understanding to the cost-benefit relationships.

What is clear, is that the Department of Veterans Affairs hires well over 350,000 full-time employees and staffing has increased by roughly 10% over the past two years.  The good news is that over 32% of VA staffing are Veterans:

Veterans Affairs Budget

Without getting into the details of the budget, it is difficult to know whether taxpayer dollars are being spent efficiently within the VA.  With an average annual salary of approximately $50,000 (estimated national average), total VA staff expenses should exceed $18 billion.  To this, one needs to tack on an additional 30% (estimated) in staff-related expenses (social security, severance pay, pension plan, unemployment insurance, etc).

Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that roughly one-third of the “discretionary” budget is allocated toward staff.  It would be most interesting to know, how much money is allocated to third-party contractors, consultants and part-time employees.

Fitch reports that on average, “staff expenses” represent 54% of total operating expenses of privately run hospitals.  As such, the “scratch-pad” analysis above suggests that the VA is woefully understaffed (i.e. 1/3 of discretionary expenses) or that staff expenses and outside contractor expenses are much higher as a percentage of total discretionary spending.

The issue is not to question whether these staffing and compensation levels are appropriate, but to determine whether the end-user (i.e. the Veteran) is receiving the full benefit of this budgetary increase.

I suspect not, but it is next to impossible to determine how funds are allocated and whether they are done so efficiently.

While the new administration appears to be sending the “right” message to the VA, the current budget seems rather superficial and I detect little that represents a major change in direction of a huge government entity that seems more interested in defending its turf than representing the interests of all Veterans.

0

Dr. David Cifu: Do Veterans with PTSD Want Him in Their Corner?

Posted by:

Stand for the Troops (“SFTT”) has written extensively about treating Veterans with PTSD and TBI.  Sadly, much of the publically available literature for brain-related injuries deals with identifying the symptoms and helping Veterans – and their loved ones – cope with terrible consequences of living with PTSD and TBI.

The issue(s) – at least in my mind – are these:

– Is treating the behavioral symptoms of PTSD and TBI enough for Veterans?  

– Have we given up hope in helping Veterans permanently reclaim their lives?

Sadly, treating the symptoms of PTSD/TBI is generally confused with actually providing Veterans with a meaningful long term solution to overcome the debilitating impact of a war-related brain injury.  

Now we learn that the VA is again studying the medicinal benefits of marijuana in treating Veterans with PTSD.   As many Veterans have been experimenting with marijuana for quite some time, I believe that the study will conclude that “medicinal marijuana, if used wisely, can mitigate anxiety, wild mood swings and suicidal thoughts among Veterans suffering from the effects of brain-related injury.”

The phrase in quotes are my words, but I suspect that conclusions of the multi-million dollar clinical study will not differ significantly.

The use of mind-altering drugs – whether medicinal marijuana or opioids – will most certainly help Veterans cope with the debilitating pain and anxiety of PTSD and TBI, but will prescription drugs meaningfully contribute to curing brain injury among Veterans?  

While the Department of Defense (“DoD”) and the Department of Veterans Affairs (“the VA”) have largely agreed that prescription drugs is not the answer, there is little evidence that the DoD or VA are clearly committed to provide Veterans with a clear path to full recovery.

Dr. David Cifu

Dr. David Cifu

In fact, the VA, represented by its spokesperson, Dr. David Cifu, continues to push a stale and failed agenda that states that the only two effective treatment therapies offered by the VA are:

– Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and,

– Prolonged Exposure Therapy.

As the SFTT and others have pointed out, the VA has little – if anything – positive to show in having treating tens of thousand of Veterans with PTSD and TBI with these therapy programs.  You don’t have to be a brain surgeon (sorry for the very poor pun) or even Dr. David Cifu to recognize that currently recommended VA therapy programs have failed Veterans miserably.

Nevertheless, Veterans, the public and countless Congressional committees continue to listen to the same irresponsible dribble year-after-year and buy the same stale argument that Veterans are getting the best treatment possible.  To use a popular phrase, a little “fact-checking” would go a long to way to dispelling this insipid myth.

Dr. David Cifu represents what is wrong with the VA:   A lack of willingness to consider other alternatives.   As Judge and Jury on what constitutes “authorized therapy programs,” the VA has effectively precluded thousands of Veterans from seeking “out of network” solutions that appear to provide a far better long-term outcome.

The VA claims otherwise as we have seen in a long battle over the efficacy of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (“HBOT”) in treating Veterans with PTSD and TBI.  Dr. David Cifu stands behind questionable studies that suggest that there is insufficient clinical evidence to support the thesis that HBOT can improve brain function.   In fact, Dr. Paul Harch, cites plenty of evidence in an academic study for the National Library of Medicine (Medical Gas Research) that conclusively demonstrates the lack of substance to Dr. Cifu’s bland and misleading opinions.

It is difficult to know whether new leadership within the VA will lead to more openness in providing Veterans with PTSD/TBI the support they require in finding therapy programs that work, but unless gatekeepers like Dr. David Cifu can be shown a quick exit, it is unlikely that much will change.

Our brave Veterans deserve far better than the sad and tragic delusional claims of Dr. Cifu.

0

Service Dogs: Helping Some Veterans Cope with PTSD

Posted by:

Service Dogs for PTSD

Photo via Pixabay by Skeeze

Soldiers returning from deployment sometimes bring the trauma of war home with them. Being injured themselves or witnessing others injured or dying, can have lasting physical and emotional effects on our military men and women. Symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, or PTSD, can surface immediately or take years to appear. These symptoms can include sleeplessness, recurring nightmares or memories, anger, fear, feeling numb, and suicidal thoughts. These symptoms can be alleviated with medications and/or by the use of service dogs.

Service Dogs for Veterans and What They Do

A service dog is one that is trained to specifically perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a physical, mental, sensory, psychiatric, or intellectual disability. Service dogs meant specifically for PTSD therapy, provide many benefits to their veteran companions. These dogs provide emotional support, unconditional love, and a partner that has the veteran’s back. Panic attacks, flashbacks, depression, and stress subside. Many vets get better sleep knowing their dog is standing watch through the night for them.

Taking an active role in training and giving the dog positive feedback can help the veteran have purpose and goals. They see that they are having a positive impact and receiving unconditional love from the dog in return. The dog can also be the veteran’s reason to move around, get some exercise, or leave the house.

Bonding with the dogs has been found to have biological effects elevating levels of oxytocin, which helps overcome paranoia, improves trust, and other important social abilities to alleviate some PTSD symptoms. When the dogs help vets feel safe and protected, anxiety levels, feelings of depression, drug use, violence, and suicidal thoughts decrease.

Service dogs can also reduce medical and psychiatric costs when used as an alternative to drug therapy. Reducing bills will reduce stress on the veteran and their family.

Impact of Service Dogs on Veterans with PTSD

These dogs offer non-stop unconditional love. When military personnel return to civilian life adjustment can be difficult, and sometimes the skills that they have acquired in the field are not the skills they can put toward a career back home. A dog will show them the same respect no matter what job they do, and that can be extremely comforting.

Service dogs can also foster a feeling of safety and trust in veterans. After going through particular experiences overseas, it may be difficult for veterans to trust their environment and feel completely safe. Dogs can offer a stable routine, be vigilant through the night (so the vet doesn’t have to), and be ever faithful and trustworthy.

Veterans sometimes have difficulty with relationships after departing the military because they are accustomed to giving and receiving orders. Dogs respond well to authority and don’t mind taking orders. The flip side is that by taking care of the dog’s needs, the veteran can also get used to recognizing and responding to the needs of others.

Service Dogs are also protective. They will be by the veteran’s side whenever needed and have their back like their buddies did on the battlefield. They will provide security and calm without judgment. The dog will not mind if you’ve had a bad day and be there to help heal emotional wounds. For this reason, PTSD service dogs are also a great help to veterans suffering from substance abuse disorders.

In an article by Mark Thompson called “What a Dog Can Do for PTSD”, an Army vet named Luis Carlos Montalvan was quoted as saying, “But for all veterans, I think, the companionship and unwavering support mean the most. So many veterans are isolated and withdrawn when they return. A dog is a way to reconnect, without fear of judgment or misunderstanding.

Check out the Department of Veteran’s Affairs for information on the VA’s service dog program by CLICKING HERE.

Here are a few of the dozens of programs to help if you are a vet or know one who could benefit from a service dog:

PawsandStripes.org

OperationWeAreHere.com

PawsForVeterans.com

SoldiersBestFriend.org

TenderLovingCanines.org

0
Page 2 of 3 123