Saluting our Veterans on Memorial Day

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Memorial Day

As we gather together to celebrate Memorial Day, I am struck by the outpouring of love and heartfelt admiration for the men and women in uniform – past and present – who have served our country so valiantly.

Often overlooked as we celebrate Memorial Day are the spouses, family and loved ones who continue to support Veterans and active duty personnel with debilitating injuries.

Stand for The Troops would like to acknowledge these courageous men and women who labor on so courageously in providing daily care to loved ones who are no longer quite the same person they were before combat.

On this Memorial Day, SFTT would like to list several organizations that continue to provide great service to our Veterans, particularly those suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (“PTSD”).

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (“HBOT”)

The Department of Veterans Affairs (“the VA”) continues to block the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy or HBOT in treating Veterans with PTSD.  Nevertheless, Dr. Paul Harch and many others continue to provide FREE or greatly discounted treatment to Veterans suffering from PTSD.

More to the point, Dr. Harch and many other evangelists go out of their way to promote the benefits of using HBOT to treat PTSD.    On this Memorial Day weekend, SFTT remains hopeful that Dr. David Shulkin, Secretary of the VA, will begin providing Veterans with better treatment alternatives, such as HBOT.

It is time to rid the VA of institutional dogma based on self-serving agendas and seek real solutions that help Veterans with PTSD and their loved ones.

Archi’s Acres, Escondido California

Karen and Colin Archipley have dedicated their lives to helping Veterans recover their lives by providing training in “sustainable organic agriculture.”  At Archi’s Acres, students receive a six-week course in hydroponics, drip/micro irrigation, environmental control, soil biology, composting and much more.

We tip our hat to both Karen and Colin for having the imagination and perseverance to help provide Veterans with an opportunity to acquire new skills on their road to recovering their lives.

Wives of PTSD Vets and Military

I often come across some inspirational stories of families coping the ravages of PTSD on a Facebook Page entitled “Wives of PTSD Vets and Military.”  While depression and a sense of helplessness affects many Veterans (active duty personnel), their caregivers often bear the brunt of their frustration.

There are many similar Facebook Page support groups such as “PTSD:  The Wives Side,” but all provide some useful advice in helping loved ones cope under circumstances that are most difficult to comprehend.

This Memorial Day my thoughts and prayers go out to caregivers that do much of the heavy day-to-day lifting,

This is not an easy journey.  Frankly, we must move beyond coping and do everything possible within our power to help our brave Veterans recover his or her life.  Only by doing so, will we be able to recover our own.

On this Memorial Day, I wish all resilient warriors the strength and courage to continue to support our Veterans.

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First Steps to Overhaul the Department of Veterans Affairs

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Dr. David Shulkin continues to impress by tackling some rather entrenched “special interest” groups within the Department of Veterans Affairs (“the VA”):

– Personnel;

– Infrastructure

Earlier this week, VA Secretary Shulkin informed a Congress that he was considering closing some 1,100 underutilized VA facilities.  The Associated Press reports that:

Shulkin said the VA had identified more than 430 vacant buildings and 735 that he described as underutilized, costing the federal government $25 million a year. He said the VA would work with Congress in prioritizing buildings for closure and was considering whether to follow a process the Pentagon had used in recent decades to decide which of its underused military bases to shutter, known as Base Realignment and Closure, or BRAC.

“Whether BRAC is a model that we should take a look, we’re beginning that discussion with members of Congress,” Shulkin told a House appropriations subcommittee. “We want to stop supporting our use of maintenance of buildings we don’t need, and we want to reinvest that in buildings we know have capital needs.”

Last week, President Trump signed an Executive Order protecting VA whistleblowers from retaliation in a quest by the VA to shed incompetent employees.

Department of Veterans Affairs

While these measures may seem rather insignificant given the overall size and reach of the VA, they could mark an important change in the direction of the VA to help respond to the needs of Veterans.

The VA has evolved into a mammoth organization intent on serving the needs of all Veterans and their families.  Roughly 60% of the VA’s $180 billion budget (2017 budget) is allocated to mandatory benefits programs.

The VA’s discretionary budget of $78.7 billion is allocated to a variety of Veteran services,  but by far, is the the $65 billion allocated to medical care facilities.   Despite regular reports of shortcomings at VA facilities, the Rand Corporation recently (2016) reported that “the Veterans Affairs health care system generally performs better than or similar to other health care systems on providing safe and effective care to patients.”

While it appears that many Veterans – quite possibly the vast majority – receive quality health services from the VA, many Veterans complain about the timeliness and quality of service provided to them.

Like other healthcare providers in the private sector, the VA has determined what health events are covered, the type of coverage provided and where the health services are administered.

One program that has come under particular attack is the Choice Program, which gives Veterans access to medical services in the private sector if the VA can’t dispense services within 30 days or a VA facility is not located within 40 miles of the Veteran.

At his confirmation hearings, now VA Secretary David Shulkin, requested that Congress expand the coverage of the Choice program and eliminate many of its administrative constraints.  Needless to say, changes in the Choice program would certainly provide a greater number of Veterans with access to private sector care.

In cases of emergency, even minor improvements to the Choice program could be of major benefits to Veterans.

Nevertheless, these changes do not provide Veterans with access to alternative therapy programs not currently approved by the VA.  As SFTT has reported on numerous occasions, PTSD is currently treated with demonstrably ineffective “approved” treatment procedures while far better and less-intrusive programs like hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) are widely used with success throughout the world.

In effect, there are a number of activities within the VA that can best be performed by third-party services.  In fact, integrating these services with community resources may prove to be more of a long term benefit to the Veteran and his or her family.

Stand for the Troops remains hopeful that Secretary Shulkin and the dedicated employees of the VA will find the right balance in helping Veterans recover their lives.

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Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) to Treat Veterans with PTSD

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Veterans and casual observers continue to be mystified why the Department of Veterans Affairs (the “VA”) continues to insist on failed therapy programs to treat Veterans with PTSD.

Dr. David Cifu, the senior TBI specialist in the Department of Veterans Affairs’ Veterans Health Administration, argues that Veterans treated with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Prolonged Exposure Therapy are receiving the best therapy possible to treat PTSD.   There is no reliable third-party verification to support Dr. Cifu’s bold assertion.

More to the point, Dr. Cifu dismisses  other treatment alternatives arguing that there is no scientific basis to support them.  In particular, Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) has been singled out for particular disdain by Dr. Cifu.

Specifically, the VA concluded their trial “study” with the following observations:

“To date, there have been nine peer-reviewed publications describing this research,” Dr. David Cifu, VA’s national director for physical medicine and rehabilitation recently told the Oklahoman. “All the research consistently supports that there is no evidence that hyperbaric oxygen has any therapeutic benefit for symptoms resulting from either mild TBI or PTSD.”

Frankly,  there is voluminous scientific evidence that HBOT is both a viable and recommended treatment alternative for Veterans suffering from PTSD and TBI.

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy or HBOT is available at many privately-owned hospitals in the United States and around the world.  There is compelling scientific evidence that HBOT reverses brain damage.

In fact, HBOT is the preferred therapy of  the Israeli Defense Forces (“IDF”) for service members with head injuries.  Frankly, this assertion alone trumps any argument to the contrary by Dr. Cifu.

In its most simple form, HBOT is a series of “dives” in a decompression chamber (normally 40) where concentrated oxygen is administered under controlled conditions by trained physicians.  There is clear and conclusive evidence that brain function improves through the controlled application of oxygen.  In effect, it stimulates and may, in fact, regenerate brain cells at the molecular level.

HBOT Brain Functionality Over Time

In addition, HBOT is far cheaper to administer than currently approved programs at the VA.   Maj. Ben Richards argues that all Veterans with PTSD and TBI could be treated with HBOT for less than 10% of the VA budget allocated for pharmaceuticals.

More to the point, the annual VA treatment costs for Veterans with PTSD and TBI are roughly $15,000. For this annual expense, many Veterans could receive HBOT.

Dr. Figueroa asks, What are we Waiting For?

Almost 3 years ago, Dr. Xavier A. Figueroa, Ph.D., in an article entitled “What the <#$*&!> Is Wrong with the DoD/VA HBOT Studies?!!” clearly sets forth a compelling scientific argument why Veterans with TBI and PTSD should be treated with HBOT.

Found below is a summary of Dr. Figueroa’s conclusions (footnotes removed):

A large fraction of the current epidemic of military suicides (22+ service members a day take their lives) are more than likely due to misdiagnosed TBI and PTSD. Although the DoD and VA have spent billions (actually, $ 9.2 billion since 2010) trying to diagnose and treat the problem, the epidemic of suicide and mental illness are larger than ever. Drug interventions are woefully inadequate, as more and more studies continue to find that pharmacological interventions are not effective in treating the varied symptoms of TBI or PTSD. In many cases suicide of veterans have been linked through prescribed overmedication.

HBOT is a safe and effective treatment with low-to-no side effects (after all, even the DOD accepted the safety of HBOT back in 2008). Access to HBOT is available within most major metropolitan centers, but the major sticking point is money. Who pays for the treatment?  Those that are willing to pay for it out-of-pocket and state taxpayers picking up the tab for brain-injured service members forced back into society without sufficient care (or forced out on a Chapter 10, when it should have been treated as a medical condition).

The continued reports of studies like the DoD/VA sponsored trials allow denial of coverage and provide adequate cover for public officials to claim that more study needs to be done. As we have seen, the conclusions of the authors of the DoD/VA sponsored studies downplay the results of effectiveness. There are sufficient studies (and growing) showing a strong positive effect of HBOT in TBI. More will be forthcoming.

The cardinal rule of medicine is “First, Do No Harm”. With HBOT, this rule is satisfied. Now, by denying or blocking a treatment that has proven restorative and healing effects, countless physicians and organizations, from the VA to DoD, Congress and the White House, could be accused of causing harm. Never mind how many experiments “fail” to show results (even when they actually show success). Failure to replicate a result is just that…a failure to replicate, not a negation of a treatment or other positive results. You can’t prove a negative and there are many clinical trials that do show the efficacy of HBOT.

The practice of medicine and the use of HBOT should not be dependent on the collective unease of a medical profession and the dilatory nature of risk adverse politicians, but on the evidence-based results that we are seeing. Within the VA, there are hard working physicians that are trying to change the culture of inertia and implement effective treatments for TBI and PTSD, using evidence based medicine. Unfortunately, evidence-based medicine only works when we accept the evidence presented to us and not on mischaracterized conclusions of a single study (or any other study). Our veterans, our citizens and our communities deserve better than what we are currently giving them: bad conclusions, institutions too scared to act in the interests of the people it serves and too many physicians unwilling to look at the accumulated evidence.

Indeed, it is time to for Dr. Shulkin to rid the VA of Dr. Cifu and embrace cost-effective treatment therapies which provide some hope for Veterans with PTSD and TBI.

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Dr. David Cifu: Do Veterans with PTSD Want Him in Their Corner?

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Stand for the Troops (“SFTT”) has written extensively about treating Veterans with PTSD and TBI.  Sadly, much of the publically available literature for brain-related injuries deals with identifying the symptoms and helping Veterans – and their loved ones – cope with terrible consequences of living with PTSD and TBI.

The issue(s) – at least in my mind – are these:

– Is treating the behavioral symptoms of PTSD and TBI enough for Veterans?  

– Have we given up hope in helping Veterans permanently reclaim their lives?

Sadly, treating the symptoms of PTSD/TBI is generally confused with actually providing Veterans with a meaningful long term solution to overcome the debilitating impact of a war-related brain injury.  

Now we learn that the VA is again studying the medicinal benefits of marijuana in treating Veterans with PTSD.   As many Veterans have been experimenting with marijuana for quite some time, I believe that the study will conclude that “medicinal marijuana, if used wisely, can mitigate anxiety, wild mood swings and suicidal thoughts among Veterans suffering from the effects of brain-related injury.”

The phrase in quotes are my words, but I suspect that conclusions of the multi-million dollar clinical study will not differ significantly.

The use of mind-altering drugs – whether medicinal marijuana or opioids – will most certainly help Veterans cope with the debilitating pain and anxiety of PTSD and TBI, but will prescription drugs meaningfully contribute to curing brain injury among Veterans?  

While the Department of Defense (“DoD”) and the Department of Veterans Affairs (“the VA”) have largely agreed that prescription drugs is not the answer, there is little evidence that the DoD or VA are clearly committed to provide Veterans with a clear path to full recovery.

Dr. David Cifu

Dr. David Cifu

In fact, the VA, represented by its spokesperson, Dr. David Cifu, continues to push a stale and failed agenda that states that the only two effective treatment therapies offered by the VA are:

– Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and,

– Prolonged Exposure Therapy.

As the SFTT and others have pointed out, the VA has little – if anything – positive to show in having treating tens of thousand of Veterans with PTSD and TBI with these therapy programs.  You don’t have to be a brain surgeon (sorry for the very poor pun) or even Dr. David Cifu to recognize that currently recommended VA therapy programs have failed Veterans miserably.

Nevertheless, Veterans, the public and countless Congressional committees continue to listen to the same irresponsible dribble year-after-year and buy the same stale argument that Veterans are getting the best treatment possible.  To use a popular phrase, a little “fact-checking” would go a long to way to dispelling this insipid myth.

Dr. David Cifu represents what is wrong with the VA:   A lack of willingness to consider other alternatives.   As Judge and Jury on what constitutes “authorized therapy programs,” the VA has effectively precluded thousands of Veterans from seeking “out of network” solutions that appear to provide a far better long-term outcome.

The VA claims otherwise as we have seen in a long battle over the efficacy of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (“HBOT”) in treating Veterans with PTSD and TBI.  Dr. David Cifu stands behind questionable studies that suggest that there is insufficient clinical evidence to support the thesis that HBOT can improve brain function.   In fact, Dr. Paul Harch, cites plenty of evidence in an academic study for the National Library of Medicine (Medical Gas Research) that conclusively demonstrates the lack of substance to Dr. Cifu’s bland and misleading opinions.

It is difficult to know whether new leadership within the VA will lead to more openness in providing Veterans with PTSD/TBI the support they require in finding therapy programs that work, but unless gatekeepers like Dr. David Cifu can be shown a quick exit, it is unlikely that much will change.

Our brave Veterans deserve far better than the sad and tragic delusional claims of Dr. Cifu.

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Gun Control and Veteran Suicides: Is Research Lacking?

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Like most everyone, the gun control debate is front and center on both sides of the political spectrum.  Sadly, very few – if any – of proposed changes to existing gun control laws would have a major impact on Veteran suicides.

ptsd

I recently came across an interesting article published in the Washington Post entitled “The reasons we don’t study gun violence the same way we study infections.”    The gist of the article is that well over half (actually 62%) of gun-related deaths in the United States reported by CDC are suicides.  Sadly, very little money is allocated to the study of suicides.  Some of these reasons stem from restrictions on gun research, but a chronic lack of funding suggests that other topics receive the lion’s share of research money.

The article, written by Carolyn Johnson,  states the following:

There are a few reasons for the gun violence research disparity. First, there are legislative restrictions on gun research. For two decades, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has been prevented from allocating funding that could be used to advocate for or promote gun control. Although that doesn’t explicitly exclude all research on gun violence, it is said to have had a chilling effect on funding.

Aside from political pressure, there is a more philosophical one in which injuries are treated differently than disease. Injuries are a public health issue, but the debate over gun research often becomes mired in a debate over whether a person who intentionally wants to hurt himself or another person will do so, with or without a firearm. Research is also often driven by where researchers see the biggest scientific opportunity to come up with a cure or therapy, and infections or cancer may simply be easier to study than gun violence using traditional tools.

One of the complications of a study like this is that it uses broad categories to look at spending trends. For example, if the majority of gun violence is suicides, it might make more sense to study suicide, regardless of whether it involves a firearm. But suicide, too, has been chronically underfunded compared with its health burden. The number of deaths annually from breast cancer are now about the same as suicide. But breast cancer research received $699 million in NIH research funding in 2016; suicide and suicide prevention received $73 million.

While it is difficulty to draw too many conclusions from Ms. Johnson’s article, it would appear that cure or therapy-related research “may simply be easier to study than gun violence using traditional tools.”   In other words, simple evidence-based studies seem to attract more funding rather than complex studies, such as suicide prevention.

Using Ms. Johnson’s analysis, it is not surprising that the VA feels more comfortable funding marijuana studies which help Veterans cope with the symptoms of PTSD rather than treat brain injury.  In fact, over the last 15 years, the VA has done little – if anything – to treat Veterans with PTSD.

Citing a National Institute of Health 2014 study of the VA, Maj. Ben Richards points out that despite the most sophisticated therapy provided by the VA the average PCL-M score to assess Post Traumatic Stress has fallen only 5 points.  In fact, PCL-M scores for “treated” Veterans is still well above the 50 benchmark considered adequate by the military.

Ben Richard's PTSD VA Study

For more of Maj. Ben Richard’s analysis of the Department of Veteran’s Affairs costly and rather futile effort to help Veterans with PTSD, please CLICK HERE.

While the VA embarks on yet another study to combat the symptoms of PTSD, tens of thousands of needy Veterans are deprived of necessary research to help them reclaim their lives rather than simply cope with their problems.

A well-tested program, Hyperbaric Oxygen therapy (“HBOT”) has allowed Maj. Ben Richards to recover much of his cognitive function.  Yet, Dr. David Cifu and others at the VA still refuse to fund HBOT for Veterans with PTSD.

Veteran suicide rates are currently 22% than the normal population.  Doesn’t it make sense to provide workable therapy programs to Veterans rather than embark yet again on studies that treat symptoms rather than the problem?  Our Veterans deserve much more.

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Drs. Paul Harch and David Cifu Spar over Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

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Well over a year ago, Dr. Paul Harch, one of the leading experts in Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (“HBOT”) published an authoritative report entitled “Hyperbaric oxygen in chronic traumatic brain injury:  oxygen, pressure and gene therapy” for the U.S. National Library of Medicine (Medical Gas Research).

In this report (a lengthy extract is printed below), Dr. Harch argues persuasively over the many benefits of using HBOT in treating brain injury:

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a treatment for wounds in any location and of any duration that has been misunderstood for 353 years. Since 2008 it has been applied to the persistent post-concussion syndrome of mild traumatic brain injury by civilian and later military researchers with apparent conflicting results. The civilian studies are positive and the military-funded studies are a mixture of misinterpreted positive data, indeterminate data, and negative data. This has confused the medical, academic, and lay communities. The source of the confusion is a fundamental misunderstanding of the definition, principles, and mechanisms of action of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. This article argues that the traditional definition of hyperbaric oxygen therapy is arbitrary. The article establishes a scientific definition of hyperbaric oxygen therapy as a wound-healing therapy of combined increased atmospheric pressure and pressure of oxygen over ambient atmospheric pressure and pressure of oxygen whose main mechanisms of action are gene-mediated. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy exerts its wound-healing effects by expression and suppression of thousands of genes. The dominant gene actions are upregulation of trophic and anti-inflammatory genes and down-regulation of pro-inflammatory and apoptotic genes. The combination of genes affected depends on the different combinations of total pressure and pressure of oxygen. Understanding that hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a pressure and oxygen dose-dependent gene therapy allows for reconciliation of the conflicting TBI study results as outcomes of different doses of pressure and oxygen.

Not surprisingly, Dr. David Cifu, Senior TBI Specialist in the Department of Veterans Affairs’ Veterans Health Administration, gave the standard stock answer from the spin doctors at the VA that:

There is no reason to believe that an intervention like HBOT that purports to decrease inflammation would have any meaningful effect on the persistence of symptoms after concussion. Three well-controlled, independent studies (funded by the Department of Defense and published in a range of peer reviewed journals) involving more than 200 active duty servicemen subjects have demonstrated no durable or clinically meaningful effects of HBOT on the persistent (>3 months) symptoms of individuals who have sustained one or more concussions. Despite these scientifically rigorous studies, the clinicians and lobbyists who make their livings using HBOT for a wide range of neurologic disorders (without scientific support) have continued to advocate the use of HBOT for concussion.

To Dr. David Cifu’s stock VA response, Dr. Harch responded as follows:

The charge is inconsistent with nearly three decades of basic science and clinical research and more consistent with the conflict of interest of VA researchers.  A final point: in no publication has the claim regarding effectiveness of HBOT in mTBI PPCS been predicated on an exclusive or even dominant anti-inflammatory effect of HBOT. Rather, the argument is based on the known micro-wounding of brain white matter in mTBI, and the known gene-modulatory, trophic wound-healing effects of HBOT in chronic wounding.  The preponderance of literature in HBOT-treated chronic wound conditions, is contrary to Dr. Cifu’s statement of HBOT as a “useless technology.”

As a layman, Dr. Harch’s detailed rebuttal (see FULL RESPONSE HERE) completely destroys Dr. Cifu’s “non-responsive” comment to the scientific points raised in Dr. Harch’s report.  In my view, it goes beyond the traditional “professional respect” shown by peers:  Dr. Harch was pissed off and, in my opinion, had every right to be.

Not surprisingly, Dr. Cifu has not responded to the irrefutable arguments presented by Dr. Harch.

The discussion of HBOT is not a subject of mild academic interest.  Specifically,  Veterans are being deprived of hyperbaric oxygen therapy because Dr. David Cifu and his cronies at the VA are misrepresenting the overwhelming evidence that suggests that HBOT restores brain function.

Why?  Indeed, that is the $64 question.

It is difficult to forecast how this academic drama will play out.  Nevertheless, I suspect that David Ciful will eventually be viewed by Veterans as performing a similar role within the VA as Alvin Young, aka “Dr. Orange.”

I hope and pray this is not the case.  On behalf of tens of thousands of Veterans who are denied HBOT treatment for PTSD and TBI by the clumsy and sloppy claims of Dr. Cifu and others within the VA, please “do the right thing” and lend your support to HBOT as a recommended VA therapy for treating brain injury.

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Drs. Paul Harch and David Cifu Spar over Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

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Well over a year ago, Dr. Paul Harch, one of the leading experts in Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (“HBOT”) published an authoritative report entitled “Hyperbaric oxygen in chronic traumatic brain injury:  oxygen, pressure and gene therapy” for the U.S. National Library of Medicine (Medical Gas Research).

Brain Function after HBOT

In this report (a lengthy extract is printed below), Dr. Harch argues persuasively over the many benefits of using HBOT in treating brain injury:

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a treatment for wounds in any location and of any duration that has been misunderstood for 353 years. Since 2008 it has been applied to the persistent post-concussion syndrome of mild traumatic brain injury by civilian and later military researchers with apparent conflicting results. The civilian studies are positive and the military-funded studies are a mixture of misinterpreted positive data, indeterminate data, and negative data. This has confused the medical, academic, and lay communities. The source of the confusion is a fundamental misunderstanding of the definition, principles, and mechanisms of action of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. This article argues that the traditional definition of hyperbaric oxygen therapy is arbitrary. The article establishes a scientific definition of hyperbaric oxygen therapy as a wound-healing therapy of combined increased atmospheric pressure and pressure of oxygen over ambient atmospheric pressure and pressure of oxygen whose main mechanisms of action are gene-mediated. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy exerts its wound-healing effects by expression and suppression of thousands of genes. The dominant gene actions are upregulation of trophic and anti-inflammatory genes and down-regulation of pro-inflammatory and apoptotic genes. The combination of genes affected depends on the different combinations of total pressure and pressure of oxygen. Understanding that hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a pressure and oxygen dose-dependent gene therapy allows for reconciliation of the conflicting TBI study results as outcomes of different doses of pressure and oxygen.

Not surprisingly, Dr. David Cifu, Senior TBI Specialist in the Department of Veterans Affairs’ Veterans Health Administration, gave the standard stock answer from the spin doctors at the VA that:

There is no reason to believe that an intervention like HBOT that purports to decrease inflammation would have any meaningful effect on the persistence of symptoms after concussion. Three well-controlled, independent studies (funded by the Department of Defense and published in a range of peer reviewed journals) involving more than 200 active duty servicemen subjects have demonstrated no durable or clinically meaningful effects of HBOT on the persistent (>3 months) symptoms of individuals who have sustained one or more concussions. Despite these scientifically rigorous studies, the clinicians and lobbyists who make their livings using HBOT for a wide range of neurologic disorders (without scientific support) have continued to advocate the use of HBOT for concussion.

To Dr. David Cifu’s stock VA response, Dr. Harch responded as follows:

The charge is inconsistent with nearly three decades of basic science and clinical research and more consistent with the conflict of interest of VA researchers.  A final point: in no publication has the claim regarding effectiveness of HBOT in mTBI PPCS been predicated on an exclusive or even dominant anti-inflammatory effect of HBOT. Rather, the argument is based on the known micro-wounding of brain white matter in mTBI, and the known gene-modulatory, trophic wound-healing effects of HBOT in chronic wounding.  The preponderance of literature in HBOT-treated chronic wound conditions, is contrary to Dr. Cifu’s statement of HBOT as a “useless technology.”

As a layman, Dr. Harch’s detailed rebuttal (see FULL RESPONSE HERE) completely destroys Dr. Cifu’s “non-responsive” comment to the scientific points raised in Dr. Harch’s report.  In my view, it goes beyond the traditional “professional respect” shown by peers:  Dr. Harch was pissed off and, in my opinion, had every right to be.

Not surprisingly, Dr. Cifu has not responded to the irrefutable arguments presented by Dr. Harch.

The discussion of HBOT is not a subject of mild academic interest.  Specifically,  Veterans are being deprived of hyperbaric oxygen therapy because Dr. David Cifu and his cronies at the VA are misrepresenting the overwhelming evidence that suggests that HBOT restores brain function.

Why?  Indeed, that is the $64 question.  

It is difficult to forecast how this academic drama will play out.  Nevertheless, I suspect that David Ciful will eventually be viewed by Veterans as performing a similar role within the VA as Alvin Young, aka “Dr. Orange.”

I hope and pray this is not the case.  On behalf of tens of thousands of Veterans who are denied HBOT treatment for PTSD and TBI by the clumsy and sloppy claims of Dr. Cifu and others within the VA, please “do the right thing” and lend your support to HBOT as a recommended VA therapy for treating brain injury.

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What Does the VA have Against HBOT for Treating PTSD?

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HBOT or Hyperbaric Oxygen TherapyStand For The Troops (“SFTT”) asks frequently what the Department of Veterans Affairs (“the VA”) has against HBOT or Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in helping to treat Veterans with PTSD.   The VA hides behind of veil of half-truths arguing that there is not enough “clinical evidence” to support HBOT.

Clearly there is and many hospitals across the United States have been treating brain trauma patients using HBOT for years.  In fact, HBOT is the “go-to” procedure for the Israel Defense Forces or “IDF” in treating PTSD and TBI.

Recently, Xavier A. Figueroa, Ph.D. has written extensively in a well-researched article entitled “What the <#$*&!> Is Wrong with the DoD/VA HBOT Studies?!!” which refutes many of the “convenient” studies by the VA.  Found below is an edited summary of a recent article by Dr. Figueroa:

A large fraction of the current epidemic of military suicides (22+ service members a day take their lives) are more than likely due to misdiagnosed TBI and PTSD. Although the DoD and VA have spent billions (actually, $ 9.2 billion since 2010) trying to diagnose and treat the problem, the epidemic of suicide and mental illness are larger than ever. Drug interventions are woefully inadequate, as more and more studies continue to find that pharmacological interventions are not effective in treating the varied symptoms of TBI or PTSD. In many cases suicide of veterans have been linked through prescribed overmedication.

On top of the military epidemic there is a large existing civilian population of TBI survivors (now ~10 million in the US alone). How many in the civilian population take their lives because the pain is just too much?  How many can’t work because their brain injury won’t allow them to work?  We don’t know because we, as a society, are just starting to realize how prevalent brain injuries have become. And how many caregivers are equally and negatively affected by caring for their brain injured relatives? And what is the COST of continuing to deny a safe and effective treatment that is constantly mischaracterized?

HBOT is a safe and effective treatment with low-to-no side effects (after all, even the DOD accepted the safety of HBOT back in 2008). Access to HBOT is available within most major metropolitan centers, but the major sticking point is money. Who pays for the treatment?  Those that are willing to pay for it out-of-pocket and state taxpayers picking up the tab for brain-injured service members forced back into society without sufficient care (or forced out on a Chapter 10, when it should have been treated as a medical condition).

The continued reports of studies like the DoD/VA sponsored trials allow denial of coverage and provide adequate cover for public officials to claim that more study needs to be done. As we have seen, the conclusions of the authors of the DoD/VA sponsored studies downplay the results of effectiveness. There are sufficient studies (and growing) showing a strong positive effect of HBOT in TBI. More will be forthcoming.

The cardinal rule of medicine is “First, Do No Harm”. With HBOT, this rule is satisfied. Now, by denying or blocking a treatment that has proven restorative and healing effects, countless physicians and organizations, from the VA to DoD, Congress and the White House, could be accused of causing harm. Never mind how many experiments “fail” to show results (even when they actually show success). Failure to replicate a result is just that…a failure to replicate, not a negation of a treatment or other positive results. You can’t prove a negative and there are many clinical trials that do show the efficacy of HBOT.

The practice of medicine and the use of HBOT should not be dependent on the collective unease of a medical profession and the dilatory nature of risk averse politicians, but on the evidence-based results that we are seeing. Within the VA, there are hard working physicians that are trying to change the culture of inertia and implement effective treatments for TBI and PTSD, using evidence based medicine. Unfortunately, evidence-based medicine only works when we accept the evidence presented to us and not on mischaracterized conclusions of a single study (or any other study). Our veterans, our citizens and our communities deserve better than what we are currently giving them: bad conclusions, institutions too scared to act in the interests of the people it serves and too many physicians unwilling to look at the accumulated evidence.

HBOT works for the treatment of mild-to-moderate TBI and PCS.

Treat now.

For those inclined to follow Dr. Figueroa’s detailed analysis, please CLICK HERE for the hard details.  Even the spin doctors and the VA would have a difficult time refuting his analysis.

Dr. Figueroa exposes many of the lies and myths perpetrated by Dr. David Cifu and others in the VA who prefer a cocktail of toxic pharmaceutical to HBOT which is a lot cheaper and has proven far more successful than VA programs.

 

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Hyperbaric Oxygen: What the VA Doesn’t Want You To Know

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The gatekeepers at the Department of Veteran Affairs (the “VA”) remain intransigent in providing urgently need care to Veterans suffering from PTSD and/or TBI. Standard Operating Procedure (“SOP”) at the VA is to argue that FDA-approved clinical studies are needed to sanction treatment methods – regardless if these treatment alternatives have been used with success in many other countries for decades and, in some cases, hundreds of years.  

hyperbaric oxygen and the VA

Instead, the VA serves our Veterans a cocktail of potentially lethal prescription drugs that do carry the FDA’s “Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval.”   How is this possible when the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (“CDC”) reports  an epidemic in addiction to prescription drugs?

Unfortunately, the VA’s SOP in prescribing these opioids to Veterans with PTSD and TBI hasn’t changed in many years.   Why?  Could it be that the benefits to Big Pharma outweigh the benefits of providing our Veterans with the treatment they merit?   I am most hesitant to ask this question, but I can think of no other explanation.

For instance, treating head injuries with Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (“HBOT”) has been around for decades.  It is the standard procedure provided to wounded soldiers and civilians with head injuries by the Israeli medical profession for decades.

This short video below is in Hebrew with English subtitles, but it provides a very compelling argument why our Veterans should have access NOW to HBOT while the bureaucrats and FDA twiddle their thumbs and continue to ingratiate themselves with Big Pharma lobbyists.

Gordon Brown  of Team Veteran argues that  “We need this type treatment in our VA and military hospitals instead of the DRUG therapy they are now using. Most TBI cases have been misdiagnosed as PTSD and drug treatment cause further complications for our veterans.”   Gordon’s views reflect my own and those of hundreds if not thousands of Veterans.

In fact, some hospitals in the private sector are taking radical steps to curtail the use of opioids in treating pain.  In an recent New York Times article, St. Joe’s hospital is implementing wide-ranging changes to comply with CDC recommendations:

“St. Joe’s is on the leading edge,” said Dr. Lewis S. Nelson, a professor of emergency medicine at New York University School of Medicine, who sat on a panel that recommended recent opioid guidelines for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “But that involved a commitment to changing their entire culture.”

In doing so, St. Joe’s is taking on a challenge that is even more daunting than teaching new protocols to 79 doctors and 150 nurses. It must shake loose a longstanding conviction that opioids are the fastest, most surefire response to pain, an attitude held tightly not only by emergency department personnel, but by patients, too.

Is it too much for that lumbering behemoth VA to show the same sense of urgency?

I suppose we can continue to get distracted with the many other “big” issues facing our country, but providing our Veterans with proper therapy is one issue where Americans can easily unite.  Let’s not let the bottom line of Big Pharma distract us from that mission.  The brave men and women who have served our country deserve no less.

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Gut Check for Veterans with PTSD

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The search to help Veterans and active duty military personnel cope with Post Traumatic Stress (“PTS” or “PTSD”) continues to attract much attention from within the scientific community and alternative medicine pundits.

It seems that almost weekly some promising new cure to treat Veterans with PTSD appears on mainstream media, with the caveat that “it will take years” to prove its efficacy.  Must our Veterans wait so long?

While many doubt the efficacy of holistic medicine and practices that date back centuries in the Far East, the Western medical profession now agrees that bacteria from our digestive system may offer potential benefits in combating stress.

Bacteria to treat Veterans with PTSD?

In an article published by Science.mic entitled “The Military Wants to Cure Soldiers of PTSD by Hacking their Gut Bacteria,” researchers found

. . .  a means to improve the smaller mice’s moods: by feeding them the same bacteria found in the poop of the bigger, calmer mice. Subsequent brain scans showed the smaller mice’s moods improved significantly.

Past research has shown similar results. One 2015 study found that probiotics in fermented food — such as sauerkraut and yogurt — change the bacterial environment in the gut, which in turn affects our anxiety levels.

Indeed, these scientific “revelations” are hardly new to those remotely familiar to Traditional Chinese Medicine.  In fact, the New York Times reported some time ago that:

It has long been known that much of our supply of neurochemicals — an estimated 50 percent of the dopamine, for example, and a vast majority of the serotonin — originate in the intestine, where these chemical signals regulate appetite, feelings of fullness and digestion.

For centuries, Traditional Chinese Medicine has been using a variety of techniques including acupuncture, reflexology and herbs to reduce stress and treat stress-related disorders.

While I have no idea how these “new”  scientific studies will pan out in the long run, it seems to me that stress-related injury is not new and that societies all over the world have been treating “stress” for centuries.

While I am not advocating that the Department of Veteran Affairs (“VA”) drop its reliance on prescription drugs to manage the symptoms of PTSD and embrace alternative medicine, it does seem disingenuous, if not foolish, to ignore the benefits of other treatment programs.

SFTT has long been supportive of several programs to treat Veterans with PTSD that have been shown to provide positive short and medium term benefits to Veterans.  In particular, Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (“HBOT”) is regularly used by the Israel Defense Forces (“IDF”) to treat military personnel for PTSD.

Sadly, the VA claims that their own tests on the efficacy of HBOT are inconclusive.

Many more examples of the intransigence of the VA can be cited, but with Veteran suicides at 22 a day and with well over 20% of returning Veterans showing symptoms of PTSD or TBI, one must ask whether the leadership of the VA is doing what is necessary to support the men and women who have served our country so valiantly.

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